emergency lighting

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raberding

Senior Member
Location
Dayton, OH
emergency lighting

you need to know which codes have been adopted - the Life Safety Code, NFPA 101; or maybe the International Building Code

The rules are within those.
 

cowboyjwc

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Simi Valley, CA
It's in the IBC the rule is 1 foot candle at the floor for the entire path of travel to the exterior of the building. Emergency exterior egress lighting is required if you are required to have two or more exits and if only two exits are required and they put in four exterior doors, you would get one at each door.

Exit signs get a little tricky, a lit exit sign isn't even required until the occupancy is more than 49 and are required to be seen from where ever you are in the building. That's the part that get's tricky. If you are in a place with a lot of tall shelves like a book store or a big orange, should you put one at the end of every aisle? And is a door to the exterior really an exit? It used to not be so, but the code now says that every door leading to the exterior is an exit. Many things you have to remember too such as you can't exit through a warehouse and you can only exit through one ajoining room, etc.

Always check with the building dept or in some cases the fire department to see what they're really going to want.
 

cowboyjwc

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Simi Valley, CA
It's in the IBC the rule is 1 foot candle at the floor for the entire path of travel to the exterior of the building.<BR><BR>Exit signs get a little tricky, a lit exit sign isn't even required until the occupancy is more than 49 and are required to be seen from where ever you are in the building.  That's the part that get's tricky.  If you are in a place with a lot of tall shelves like a book store or a big orange, should you put one at the end of every aisle?  And is a door to the exterior really an exit?  It used to not be so, but the code now says that every door leading to the exterior is an exit.  Many things you have to remember too such as you can't exit through a warehouse and you can only exit through one ajoining room, etc.<BR><BR>Always check with the building dept or in some cases the fire department to see what they're really going to want.
 

102 Inspector

Senior Member
Location
N/E Indiana
Another issue to watch out for is the requirement that exit illumination include the exterior landing when 2 or more exits are required. This items is missed by most electricians and it has taken a couple years to get the ones around here to remember them. I have many plans reviewed simply for exit sign / emergency lighting requirements. In the 2006 International Building Code, these requirements are found in Section 1006.
 

RICK NAPIER

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Here is a link to the ICC codes
http://publicecodes.citation.com/icod/index.htm

and the code article
1006.2 Illumination level. The means of egress illumination level shall not be less than 1 footcandle (11 lux) at the walking surface.

Exception: For auditoriums, theaters, concert or opera halls and similar assembly occupancies, the illumination at the walking surface is permitted to be reduced during performances to not less than 0.2 footcandle (2.15 lux), provided that the required illumination is automatically restored upon activation of a premises' fire alarm system where such system is provided.
 

ryan89

Member
Location
KC
It's in the IBC the rule is 1 foot candle at the floor for the entire path of travel to the exterior of the building. Emergency exterior egress lighting is required if you are required to have two or more exits and if only two exits are required and they put in four exterior doors, you would get one at each door.

Exit signs get a little tricky, a lit exit sign isn't even required until the occupancy is more than 49 and are required to be seen from where ever you are in the building. That's the part that get's tricky. If you are in a place with a lot of tall shelves like a book store or a big orange, should you put one at the end of every aisle? And is a door to the exterior really an exit? It used to not be so, but the code now says that every door leading to the exterior is an exit. Many things you have to remember too such as you can't exit through a warehouse and you can only exit through one ajoining room, etc.

Always check with the building dept or in some cases the fire department to see what they're really going to want.
I think most places assume a customer can reasonably make it to the end of the aisle into the "racetrack". When I've done layouts with a similar situation I assume they can make it out of the aisle and I've never had an issue.

What about doors which are just there for delivery? If a door is defined as an egress door, all sorts of ADA guidelines come into play. And would you need to point public patrons in the direction of a door to the exterior in a non-public area? For example, a door in a commercial kitchen meant for deliveries (but the kitchen has 2 other exit paths out of it). Would there need to be an exit sign above this door? Would customers need to be directed through a potentially hazardous kitchen now that the door might be the closest egress door? I know this is all off topic, but it got me thinking.
 

cowboyjwc

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Simi Valley, CA
I think most places assume a customer can reasonably make it to the end of the aisle into the "racetrack". When I've done layouts with a similar situation I assume they can make it out of the aisle and I've never had an issue.

What about doors which are just there for delivery? If a door is defined as an egress door, all sorts of ADA guidelines come into play. And would you need to point public patrons in the direction of a door to the exterior in a non-public area? For example, a door in a commercial kitchen meant for deliveries (but the kitchen has 2 other exit paths out of it). Would there need to be an exit sign above this door? Would customers need to be directed through a potentially hazardous kitchen now that the door might be the closest egress door? I know this is all off topic, but it got me thinking.
It used to say that you only needed to worry about exit's complying if they were required exits. Now it says that any door leading to the exterior is an exit and must comply. And then all exits are required to get you away from the building. So lets say that your door lead you into a fenced in area then the fence would be required to have a man gate with panic hardware.
 
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