Extra wire in cable -- cut, leave in place, or ground?

Status
Not open for further replies.

lakee911

Senior Member
So, this comes from another forum, but I don't agree with the responses there so I'm asking the experts...

I have a spool of SEOOW 10/4 wire I plan to use with locking plugs/recectpacles that only need 10/3 in the setup.

Is is ACCEPTABLE to just leave the wire cut flush to the cable or am I supposed to cap off every end unterminated (inside the connector bodies ) ....which may get a little tight in the body...
My comment was to tie the extra wire to ground. Others thought that it should just be snipped on both sides.

What do we think?
 

raider1

Senior Member
Staff member
I see no reason to connect an unused conductor in a multiwire cable to the EGC.

IMHO, you can just cut off the unused conductor at each end.

Chris
 

Volta

Senior Member
Codewise, conductors shall be insulated 310.2(A).

In general, in cables, there is no reason to cut a conductor off if usused.

Grounding it seems like a good idea, but the terminal isn't likely rated for multiple wires.

It is likely that the cord to be used isn't allowed to be used with that connector 110.3(B).

Best answer: Use the proper cord.

Reality answer: Cut the offending wire to an inch or so, pull the copper up and push the insulation down, cut the wire strands off, insulate the end with shrink-tubing, fold over between the remaining conductors.
 

lakee911

Senior Member
Might not be enough room to cap it off in the connector.

Two wires per terminal could be an issue.

I don't have my NEC handy, but could this be considered abandoned? Would that have any impact?
 

Volta

Senior Member
If this is for "light or power" wiring, abandoned wire is a non-isuue, not referenced as far as I know.

References to "abandonded" cables are usually for special classes of circuits: Fiber, signalling, communication, etc.
 

Volta

Senior Member
While it might be a 110.3(B) issue, if one uses some patience and precision, it can be neatly trimmed, insulated, and tucked between the remaining wires in the cord cap or connector, or so I have heard. :roll:

I have seen, some time ago, an insulation that could be applied as a paste or liquid from the can lid brush. More than is needed for this, probably. :)
 

Jim W in Tampa

Senior Member
I think it would be a violation to connect to the ground as it is not green or bare.
If space permits i would cap for future, in not cut it off.
 

Volta

Senior Member
I think it would be a violation to connect to the ground as it is not green or bare.


If space permits i would cap for future, in not cut it off.
I can't find anything in the Code that would forbid grounding a counductor for safety purposes, if not intended to "connect normally non-current carrying metal parts of equipment together and to the system grounded conductor . . ." (Art 100: Grounding Conductor, Equipment) or a "circuit or system conductor that is intentionally grounded" (Art 100:Grounded Conductor).

250.119 doesn't seem to apply. What Section do you feel would be violated if a non-bare or non-green conductor is connected to ground, but not used as an EGC or grounded circuit conductor?
 

Cow

Senior Member
Mountain out of a mole hill.....

Cut it off flush or like I do, leave it the same length as the others and put a few wraps of tape over the end.:cool:
 

benaround

Senior Member
I can't find anything in the Code that would forbid grounding a counductor for safety purposes, if not intended to "connect normally non-current carrying metal parts of equipment together and to the system grounded conductor . . ." (Art 100: Grounding Conductor, Equipment) or a "circuit or system conductor that is intentionally grounded" (Art 100:Grounded Conductor).

250.119 doesn't seem to apply. What Section do you feel would be violated if a non-bare or non-green conductor is connected to ground, but not used as an EGC or grounded circuit conductor?
Volta, If it is connected to the EGC at both ends, it 'is' being used as an EGC.
 

Pierre C Belarge

Senior Member
Mountain out of a mole hill.....

Cut it off flush or like I do, leave it the same length as the others and put a few wraps of tape over the end.:cool:

As long as the cord is not too large for the particular cord cap, I agree with Cow.
Read the box the cord cap comes in and see what range of cords it is listed for.
 

Volta

Senior Member
So, connect it at one end only?
Probably more compliant to do that.
-but-
Still seems unlikely that the grounding terminal can reliably secure two wires. I would not do that. Better to chance an extra wire within the assembly becoming connected to a circuit conductor than the EGC coming loose from an improper termination.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top