FYI on CSST

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petersonra

Senior Member
As stated previously, grounding is the intentional connection of a current carrying conductor to ground (earth). There are three basic reasons for grounding:
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To limit voltages caused by lightning or by accidental contact of the supply conductors with conductors of higher voltage
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To stabilize the voltage under normal operating conditions
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To facilitate the operation of over-current devices (such as fuses, circuit breakers or relays) under ground-fault conditions
One has to wonder why they chose #6 as the appropriate size for the bonding wire. If all you are doing is trying to maintain the same potential, one would think that the existing bonding wire (typically #12) would be adequate.
 

M. D.

Senior Member
Check this out Wadflex wants gas fitters to put these tags just about everywhere they use the stuff , they are to give one to homeowner and or builder as well. These guys also seem to want the bonding jumper to be based on 250.122 I think :-?
http://www.wardflex.com/design_install.htm[/URL]


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The bonding point must be in as close proximity to the electrical panel as practical; close proximity of
the bonding point to the gas meter is also desirable.

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The wire gauge for this bond must be sized, at a minimum, for the full amperage available through the
electric service.

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Further minimizing impedance over the bonding assembly is desirable. The NEC should be referred to
for additional requirements and specific techniques for bonding and
grounding.

http://www.wardflex.com/design_install.htm
http://www.wardflex.com/design_install.htm
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
I am not sure of that M.D. It may be asking for it to be based on 250.66.

A friend of mine ran a #6 back to the main ground rod and got turned down for 2 reasons. First they wanted a #4 based on 200 amp service and they wanted the connection in the main panel.

This same inspection office made me connect to the ground rod with a #6 about 2 months ago.

Go figure. I have stated to my builders that I am not bonding these pipes because of the lack of knowledge and the discrepancy on how to proceed. Why should I be brought in on a lawsuit-- not my chit man.
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
H. Protection for Gas Piping Systems in High Lightning Strike Regions
TracPipe CounterStrike
Model Number(s) FGP-CS-375 FGP-CS-500 FGP-CS-750
FGP-CS-100 FGP-CS-125 FGP-CS-150 FGP-CS-200
H.1 Primary protection from lightning near strikes for all metallic systems within a building is recommended to be provided by proper grounding of the electrical system and equipotential bonding of all metallic systems including the gas piping system. Grounding and bonding shall be in accordance with the National Electrical Code ANSI/NFPA 70.
H.2 The installation of a lightning protection system per NFPA 780 is recommended in areas prone to a high level of lightning strikes to protect the building In the event of a direct strike.
H.3 CounterStrike shall consist of TracPipe stainless steel pressure liner and an engineered polymer jacket. The jacket shall be designed to enhance the energy dissipating properties of the flexible gas piping. CounterStrike shall be tested by a recognized lightning laboratory. In lightning prone areas,
Counterstrike is recommended for an additional level of gas piping system protection from indirect strikes.
H.4 The use of CounterStrike shall be coupled with equipotential bonding of the gas piping system and all other metallic systems to the grounding electrode in accordance with NEC Section 250.104. The bonding jumper should be sized in accordance with NEC Table 250.66.
H.5 Wherever possible, TracPipe and CounterStrike CSST runs should be installed with a bend radius of 8 inches or more.
H.6 For additional protection, TracPipe PS-II may be used for the trunk line running from the meter to a central location within the building.
 
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peter d

Senior Member
Location
New England
When and if I build my own home, it's going to have black pipe for the gas lines and copper for the water lines. Call me old fashioned or a Yankee but the more I hear about modern plumbing methods, the less I like them.

Edit: And by modern plumbing methods, I mean indoor plumbing. ;) :D
 

M. D.

Senior Member
I love this little tid bit ,






What is problematic is the requirement to size the bonding jumper in accordance with Table 250.66. This table is intended for sizing of the grounding electrode conductor (not the same as the bonding jumper) which is based on the size of the ungrounded service conductor at the entrance of the building. This can result in a bonding jumper much larger than a 6 AWG copper wire especially for large buildings and/or multi-family structures. Using the exception in Section 250.66(A), if a rod, plate, or pipe is used as the grounding electrode, the grounding electrode conductor need not be larger than a 6 AWG copper wire. The argument still must be made (to the local electrical inspector) that the bonding jumper be sized in a similar fashion. However, this exception is open



to interpretation and can be misused when sizing the bonding jumper. Therefore, caution is recommended when referring to this particular section of the NEC. Until these six sets of installation instructions are written with identical language, there will be confusion in the field (both installers and inspectors) and the real possibility of improperly sizing the bonding jumper. Efforts are underway to remedy this situation
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I got a remedy,,... yank this crap




 

peter d

Senior Member
Location
New England
So what happens with the thousands of miles of this stuff that has been installed unbonded over the past 5 or so years?

Who assumes that liability?
 
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