How to secure floating disconnect?

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Aledrell

Senior Member
I went to job where builder ran 3/4 IMC, for pool equipment. They pulled in 8awg, and someone went and put a 1g bell box on top of the pipe and seal tight whipped to pool pump timer. They hooked up 12 awg in seal tight to the 8 awg and left pool light disconnected. I want to put one of those 2 space 4 circuit Nema3 subpanel where the bell box is. I would then put in a quad breaker 20-20-20-20 so I could power the light too. My problem is that this conduit is coming up out of the grass infront of the pool equipment. I don't really want to dig up and move the conduit, I want to place this small disconnect/subpanel on top of the conduit but I am afraid the conduit is not sturdy enough to hold this disc in mid air. I know on commerical roofs we use a sheet metal stand, but in grass I need some advice on what I can use to support my box. I thought about hammering in some strut but I'm sure it would rust, any ideas? Thanks.
 

augie47

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Tennessee
Occupation
State Electrical Inspector (Retired) DINOSAUR
The 20-20-20-20 breaker leaves some question in my mind. The pump and light are required to be GFCI protected. How is this being accomplished ?
 

Aledrell

Senior Member
The 20-20-20-20 breaker leaves some question in my mind. The pump and light are required to be GFCI protected. How is this being accomplished ?


With a GFI Rec in between sub panel and light. I've never seen a pool pump GFI protected around here. In Arizona pools are in the ground, and the pump is at min 10ft from pool, although we always have to bond the motor.
 
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Aledrell

Senior Member
Mix cement but I'm an electrician, you guys go too far.:grin:


Thanks for the info, if I must I will, I will evaluate after installation. I posted this question and quickly ducked waiting for everyone to start whipping me with some code violation.:grin:
 

e57

Senior Member
Mix cement but I'm an electrician, you guys go too far.:grin:


Thanks for the info, if I must I will, I will evaluate after installation. I posted this question and quickly ducked waiting for everyone to start whipping me with some code violation.:grin:
I've been known to do framing - even tie rebar, on one occasion weld...

My favorite way to mix small batches of concrete is 2 - 5 Gallon buckets - just pour back and forth as if you were mixing a large cocktail.

If you want a code beating - you're in the right place. ;) Just hang out more often...
 

ultramegabob

Senior Member
Location
Indiana
My favorite way to mix small batches of concrete is 2 - 5 Gallon buckets - just pour back and forth as if you were mixing a large cocktail.

For something like a post hole, I just fill the hole with water then slowly dump the concrete mix in, the water will seep in by itself. All the concrete is doing is filling the hole, its not like it needs alot of compression strength in a case like this.
 
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LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Location
Henrico County, VA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
For something like a post hole, I just fill the hole with water then slowly dump the concrete mix in, the water will seep in by itself. All the concrete is doing is filling the hole, its not like it needs alot of compression strength in a case like this.
For that matter, you can just dump in the dry mix first, and then add the water second.

Even adding water second is an option. The concrete will harded from ground moisture.
 

curt swartz

Electrical Contractor - San Jose, CA
Location
San Jose, CA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
A simpler option would be to drive 2 sticks of ? rigid conduit into the ground. You can either mount a small piece of plywood to them or mount the panel directly to them.
 

e57

Senior Member
For something like a post hole, I just fill the hole with water then slowly dump the concrete mix in, the water will seep in by itself. All the concrete is doing is filling the hole, its not like it needs alot of compression strength in a case like this.
WHAT?! Getting a little slumb - and I'm working too hard?! :roll:

As for PT - some scrap galvy strut will out last it here. (Depending on the neighborhood.)
 

glene77is

Senior Member
Location
Memphis, TN
Mix cement ...
... some code violation...

There would be a code violation
if you do not support the JB or subpanel properly.
I guess you already figure that out, though.
I make money fixing things like this :grin:

I also mix concrete, dig trenches, fix other peoples work, patch roofs, cut 2x4s, and bill for it ALL.
Anything to do a good and complete job.
:)
 

glene77is

Senior Member
Location
Memphis, TN
With a GFI Rec in between sub panel and light.

Aledrell,
I have a question ... Residential Yard Light.

(1) Can you run a circuit from a subpanel, to an exterior receptical with a GFCI receptical.
(2) Then run down RNC into the ground, then pull UF across the yard to the lamp post, and up RNC into the lamp post.
(3) Can the UF be buried in a shallow trench
(less than 24") ???

I have seen (or dreamed) a diagram depicting this setup, with the UF buried at 6",
allowed because the GFCI protection
was immediately ahead of the shallow trenching.

So, in this scenario,
Can the UF be buried in a shallow trench
(less than 24") ???

I have looked high and low,
searched all my graphic downloads
searched my three code/handbooks,
and come up empty.

I look forward to some comments.
 

e57

Senior Member
wow galvy will outlast pt...opposite here. eventually any steel will rust
here...
Rot - termites, and other bugs, mold... PT will last ~5 with no other maintenance and exposed. At which it will split, warp or rot and become bug food. I also live in constant fog. (literaly)

A galvy post - >20 years untreated....
 
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