Is a racked in breaker with the door open for inspection considered live work?

coop3339

Senior Member
Location
NJ
Is a racked in breaker with the door open for inspection considered live work? My thought is that it is not, because there are no live conductors exposed except for control wiring. I looked through 70e but couldn't find anything.

Thanks,
Mike
 

EC Dan

Senior Member
Location
Florida
Occupation
E&C Manager
If you are just talking about the hinged door of a panelboard enclosure, and all the trim panels and the dead front are installed, and all circuit positions are occupied with breakers or filler plates, then I'd agree with you.
 

coop3339

Senior Member
Location
NJ
More specifically, it is a drawout type breaker in switchgear. We just need to check breaker settings and unfortunately the settings are located behind the door. I guess the question is if a Drawout breaker in the closed position and operating, with the door open is considered an arc flash hazard. There are no exposed conductors or bussing, just control wiring.
 

mayanees

Senior Member
Location
Westminster, MD
Occupation
Electrical Engineer and Master Electrician
I would go to the "Likelihood of Occurrence" table 130.5(C) for determination of whether PPE is necessary. If it's just deadfront exposure and it's in Normal condition, then there's no requirement for PPE. If there is anything exposed, then you would need PPE to open the door, but then if you're out of the restricted approach boundary no PPE is required.
 

jim dungar

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Wisconsin
Occupation
Retired Electrical Engineer - Power Systems
It depends on the breaker. For example: old Siemens and GE 600V switchgear breakers had exposed components when the door was opened. While Westinghouse, Square D, and CH breaker had an inner deadfront, so nothing was exposed when you looked at the trip unit.

Your decision should be based on a risk analysis.
 
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