Is it good practice to turn off power to connect power loggers to loadcenters/panelboards?

Since voltage/current testing is exempt from an energized work permit, power loggers can be connected to an energized panelboard without a permit. But, it doesn't need to be energized while installing it so should it be done de-energized?
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
IMO it should be de-energized if practicable. Having said that we work on energized panels all of the time, depending on the task it could be almost every day.
 

petersonra

Senior Member
Location
Northern illinois
Occupation
engineer
Since voltage/current testing is exempt from an energized work permit, power loggers can be connected to an energized panelboard without a permit. But, it doesn't need to be energized while installing it so should it be done de-energized?
Is testing exempt from a permit, or is it just one of the few reasons one is permitted to work energized and thus would need a permit.
 
Is testing exempt from a permit, or is it just one of the few reasons one is permitted to work energized and thus would need a permit.

Yes, it's exempt. 130.2(C)(1) exempts testing, troubleshooting, or voltage measuring from the energized work permit.

Because of this exemption, my organization installs temporary power loggers (for 30-day logging) while energized. I took an NFPA 70E course this week and the instructor pointed out that we shouldn't be doing that since the eqipment does not need to be energized when installing the loggers and he referenced the infeasibility clause in 110.4(B). I've never seen anyone turn off the power on a typical panelboard (e.g., 200A 208Y/120V, 100A 240/120V, etc.) to install a power logger so it seems excessive.
 

mayanees

Senior Member
Location
Westminster, MD
Occupation
Electrical Engineer and Master Electrician
Yes, it's exempt. 130.2(C)(1) exempts testing, troubleshooting, or voltage measuring from the energized work permit.

Because of this exemption, my organization installs temporary power loggers (for 30-day logging) while energized. I took an NFPA 70E course this week and the instructor pointed out that we shouldn't be doing that since the eqipment does not need to be energized when installing the loggers and he referenced the infeasibility clause in 110.4(B). I've never seen anyone turn off the power on a typical panelboard (e.g., 200A 208Y/120V, 100A 240/120V, etc.) to install a power logger so it seems excessive.
We may have been in the same class. I specifically asked the instructor if there would ever be a case where the installation of PQ monitoring equipment would be done without an EEWP and she said no. The good news though was that removing covers while energized is probably okay, as long as your suited to the hazard. That's because the "working on" definition does not include removal of covers.
 
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