Issues with a Local Inspector

edgetech

Member
Location
Rochester, NH US
Have a 200A Underground Service (single family, residential) in New Hampshire... New Construction... Service conductors come up into a meter socket and then back down through conduit for approx 20 feet, below ground, along the OUTSIDE of the foundation. It then comes out of the ground and LB's into the basement where it changes over to Metallic Liquidtight for approx 2 - 2 1/2 feet where it then enters the main disconnect panel.

Local Inspector demands a Meter Disconnect on the outside of the building. But he can not and will not recite why he is requiring this. We point out NEC 270.70 (A)(1). It is also, not a "local" requirement (we did ask about this). But he won't go any further about explaining why he wants what he does...

Could you please advise us on this and if we are missing something in the code that DOES require this... And what we should do if he continues to insist on this change without explanation. Our business owner says we will change it if we HAVE (if WE missed something), but it is a costly change and he doesn't want to do it just because the inspector says so without explanation...

Thanks for any help!!
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
The code only requires a disconnect once the service conductors enter the building and states " as near as possible to the point of entry. The inspector is incorrect on this issue
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
It is really just an extension of the power company wires coming to the building.... I understand the inspector wants the wire protected above grade but I can literally pipe above ground from one side of the building to the other without a disco
 

don_resqcapt19

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Illinois
Occupation
retired electrician
The rule says "nearest the point of entry" of the service conductors....to some AHJs 2 1/2' is not in compliance with the code rule.

It is my opinion that "nearest" means exactly that...you come though the inside surface of the wall and directly into the service equipment enclosure.
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Professional Engineer, Fire & Life Safety
Have a 200A Underground Service (single family, residential) in New Hampshire... New Construction... Service conductors come up into a meter socket and then back down through conduit for approx 20 feet, below ground, along the OUTSIDE of the foundation. It then comes out of the ground and LB's into the basement where it changes over to Metallic Liquidtight for approx 2 - 2 1/2 feet where it then enters the main disconnect panel.

Local Inspector demands a Meter Disconnect on the outside of the building. But he can not and will not recite why he is requiring this. We point out NEC 270.70 (A)(1). It is also, not a "local" requirement (we did ask about this). But he won't go any further about explaining why he wants what he does...

Could you please advise us on this and if we are missing something in the code that DOES require this... And what we should do if he continues to insist on this change without explanation. Our business owner says we will change it if we HAVE (if WE missed something), but it is a costly change and he doesn't want to do it just because the inspector says so without explanation...

Thanks for any help!!
You will have to take the issue up with the Construction Official, if there is one, or go to the state office that has jurisdiction and make a complaint.
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
The rule says "nearest the point of entry" of the service conductors....to some AHJs 2 1/2' is not in compliance with the code rule.

It is my opinion that "nearest" means exactly that...you come though the inside surface of the wall and directly into the service equipment enclosure.
I had the impression that was not what the inspector ad issue with. That 2 1/2' could be the distance down from the joist. It is always allowed here and some areas have a distance rule.
 

GerryB

Senior Member
The rule says "nearest the point of entry" of the service conductors....to some AHJs 2 1/2' is not in compliance with the code rule.

It is my opinion that "nearest" means exactly that...you come though the inside surface of the wall and directly into the service equipment enclosure.
I don't think he (ahj) is talking about that. Most over head services you enter the house above the foundation and then you have a couple of feet to your panel which is maybe mounted to plywood on the foundation wall. You couldn't go right into the panel without going through the foundation. I'm wondering usually they have an inspection of the trench before it's buried why it didn't come up then.
 

edgetech

Member
Location
Rochester, NH US
The rule says "nearest the point of entry" of the service conductors....to some AHJs 2 1/2' is not in compliance with the code rule.

It is my opinion that "nearest" means exactly that...you come though the inside surface of the wall and directly into the service equipment enclosure.
This length is from where the the conduit entered the building over the foundation and then proceeded directly down into the panel via the liquid-tight.
 

GerryB

Senior Member
This length is from where the the conduit entered the building over the foundation and then proceeded directly down into the panel via the liquid-tight.
Sounds like a nice job to me. I had an inspector tell me on a new house if I wanted to pipe under the foundation and come straight up in some other part of the basement it was ok without a disco.
 

GoldDigger

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Placerville, CA, USA
Occupation
Retired PV System Designer
Sounds like a nice job to me. I had an inspector tell me on a new house if I wanted to pipe under the foundation and come straight up in some other part of the basement it was ok without a disco.
I believe that if you are under 2" of concrete you are considered to still be outside the house, so that makes perfect sense.
 
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