KINKED WIRE

Status
Not open for further replies.

able123

Member
Location
Virginia
When fixing a hole in the wall behind a baseboard heater - subsequently removing it from wall - I noticed that the feeder wire had been bent sharply - As I understand code to stipulate no bends in wire smaller than 10 times wire size, I am wondering, as is the homeowner, if that supply line should be replaced.
Your comments and expertise are appreciated. ax2opan@aol.com
 
Location
Kansas
Re: KINKED WIRE

Bends: Bends in cable shall be made,and other handlings shall be such,that the protective coverings of the cable will not damage,and the radius of the curve of the inner edge of the inner edge of the bend shall NOT be LESS than five times the diameter of the cable.
 

bphgravity

Senior Member
Location
Florida
Re: KINKED WIRE

You know how traffic gets when 4 lanes are reduced down to one! Thats what electrons due through bends. I would suggest removing the bend or total replacement.
 

rkryst

Member
Location
Maryland
Re: KINKED WIRE

Sure enough, if you bend a wire enough it will impede the flow of electrons. It's just like bending a garding hose.
 

Ed MacLaren

Senior Member
Re: KINKED WIRE

Long ago, when I was in college, if I submitted an assignment or exam paper with answers that were obviously bull-cr*p, one of my instructors would draw a little pitchfork next to the offending answer.

Some of these responses brought back memories. :)
Julian Alvarez has the right answer.




Ed

[ March 02, 2003, 08:16 AM: Message edited by: Ed MacLaren ]
 

Len_B

Member
Location
New Hampshire
Re: KINKED WIRE

Bending creates problems when the mechanical limits of the conductor are exceeded. This is normally much more prevalent a problem with solid conductors than stranded. The stretching and compression of metal on the respective outside and inside radii can lead to small cracks and/or a reduction in the cross sectional area of the conductor. This can create a point in the conductor having greater impedence than the "normal" wire, and create a "hot spot" which then further damages(thermally) the conductor.

BTW, The electrons will continue to speed ahead at approximately 2/3 the speed of light, but as the circuit resistance increases fewer will flow in the entire circuit.
 

able123

Member
Location
Virginia
Re: KINKED WIRE

From what I gather, one would have to bend, on purpose, a length of 14 guage romex to create a hot spot. AND, that would be then depending on amp load through that point. Am I understanding you all?
thanks,
ax
 

Ed MacLaren

Senior Member
Re: KINKED WIRE

able123,

The code rules specifying minimum cable bending radius is to prevent damage to the insulation and cable sheath.

I wouldn't lose any sleep over "hot spots" unless the conductor itself was actually fractured.

Ed
 

bphgravity

Senior Member
Location
Florida
Re: KINKED WIRE

Its a shame that some of you have nothing better to do than critcize and comment on someone elses opinions and suggestions. I am not claiming that typical bends in wire and cable casuses problems, however the original post stated the bend was very sharp beyond normal considerations. I am not in the practice of doing things to the bare minimums or to just get by. Obviously, the bend is beyond code allowance, and therofore needs to be corrected. As an instructor, I find ways to explain information to individuals that are not trained or educated in electrical theory or practices in ways that may be easier to understand. If you think it is crap, so be it. I think half the crap I read on these forums is crap. However, I don't go around looking to slam someones suggestions or input because I don't agree with it. Education comes through discussion. If you want to burn books and ideas, move to China.
 

iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
Re: KINKED WIRE

bphgravity,

I apologize if I offended you, I truly believed you where playing around with part of your answer as I have never heard of electrons having trouble with bends outside of lightning protection, but that could be my own lack of knowledge, I have removed my post and hope you know I was not trying to slam you.

Bob
 

Ed MacLaren

Senior Member
Re: KINKED WIRE

bphgravity,

I also apologize if I offended you.

I wasn't responding to your post specifically. I actually thought the guys were joking. Sorry. :eek:

Ed
 

able123

Member
Location
Virginia
Re: KINKED WIRE

People,
Thank you for your input to the first post.
Problem corrected for the sake of better safe than sorry.
HOWEVER, inspecting another unit we found the same problem.
example: wire comes in from top through wall cavity - stapled on bottom plate - 8 to 10 inches for equipment install - nockout on unit is about two inches from bottom of plate when in position.
connecting and securing unit to wall causes wire to compress and kink.
SO - any good elec. could figure this out- remove staple , put cable clamp tensioners on inside of box? Repair any damage to wall after fixing slack
and hope for the best when you push the unit to the wall? etc.
. Please forgive me for my inexperience
as this might not be a problem for so many of you.
I have seen it happen and expect that its not the first time. :eek:
 

bphgravity

Senior Member
Location
Florida
Re: KINKED WIRE

Thank you for your apologies, I am also sorry for being so defensive. I guess the point I was trying to make is that if you wouldn't install a new wire with a bend so severe that it could be termed "kinked", than why would you leave an existing one alone just because you weren't the one to originaly installed it. I put myself in able123's shoes and know I wouldn't be comfortable leaving the wire in that state. Thanks again. You guys are true professionals and gentlemen.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top