kitchen hood

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elecold

Member
A kitchen hood fan cannot be fed off of the small appliance circuit. How much does a hood fan typically draw?

Feedback appreciated
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
Take note of number (5) if it's cord and plug connected.

422.16(B)(4) Range Hoods. Range hoods shall be permitted to be
cord-and-plug-connected with a flexible cord identified as
suitable for use on range hoods in the installation instruc-
tions of the appliance manufacturer, where all of the fol-
lowing conditions are met:
(1) The flexible cord is terminated with a grounding-type
attachment plug.
Exception: A listed range hood distinctly marked to iden-
tify it as protected by a system of double insulation, or its
equivalent, shall not be required to be terminated with a
grounding-type attachment plug.
(2) The length of the cord is not less than 450 mm (18 in.)
and not over 900 mm (36 in.).
(3) Receptacles are located to avoid physical damage to the
flexible cord.
(4) The receptacle is accessible.
(5) The receptacle is supplied by an individual branch
circuit.
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
A kitchen hood fan cannot be fed off of the small appliance circuit. How much does a hood fan typically draw?

Feedback appreciated
It does not matter what the draw is as the code is definitive on this rule. One could also ask the same about an under cabinet light on a SABC. It is just not allowed and it is easier to write the code as it is rather than to make all kinds of allowances.
 

jxofaltrds

Senior Member
Location
Mike P. Columbus Ohio
Occupation
ESI
I dont understand? A receptacle that supplies the countertop is ALLOWED on the SABC... A fixed microwave or hood is not... Not sure what the confusion is?
(5) Receptacle Outlet Location. Receptacle outlets shall
be located on or above, but not more than 500 mm (20 in.)
above, the countertop. Receptacle outlet assemblies listed
for the application shall be permitted to be installed in
countertops. Receptacle outlets rendered not readily accessible
by appliances fastened in place, appliance garages,
sinks, or rangetops as covered in 210.52(C)(1), Exception,
or appliances occupying dedicated space shall not be considered
as these required outlets.

I can mount a receptacle more than 20" above the counter - it just doesn't count as required.
 

stickboy1375

Senior Member
Location
Litchfield, CT
(5) Receptacle Outlet Location. Receptacle outlets shall
be located on or above, but not more than 500 mm (20 in.)
above, the countertop. Receptacle outlet assemblies listed
for the application shall be permitted to be installed in
countertops. Receptacle outlets rendered not readily accessible
by appliances fastened in place, appliance garages,
sinks, or rangetops as covered in 210.52(C)(1), Exception,
or appliances occupying dedicated space shall not be considered
as these required outlets.

I can mount a receptacle more than 20" above the counter - it just doesn't count as required.
You're confusing... The OP's topic was a hood not being on a SABC, you stated that its done all the time, my question was why it was allowed.
 

stickboy1375

Senior Member
Location
Litchfield, CT
The OP is wrong.

It is done all the time because it is not prohibited.

What do you call the microwave circuit? Lighting? Laundry? Outdoor?

I would call it a branch circuit, but it cannot be a SABC that is required in the NEC.... This is pretty clear in the NEC. You pick a lot of battles and I think you lose everyone... ;)

Simply read 210.52 (B) (2)
 
Last edited:

stickboy1375

Senior Member
Location
Litchfield, CT
Q. Can I connect a range hood in a dwelling unit kitchen to the small appliance circuit?

A. No. The 20A, 120V small-appliance circuit is only permitted to supply the receptacle outlets as per 210.52(B) [210.11(C)(1)]. However, range hoods can be hardwired to a 15A or 20A, 120V circuit, unless the instructions state otherwise. Cord-and-plug connected range hoods must be supplied by an individual 15A or 20A, 120V branch circuit in accordance with the equipment instructions [422.16(B)(4)(5)].

http://ecmweb.com/nec/code-qa-23
 

jxofaltrds

Senior Member
Location
Mike P. Columbus Ohio
Occupation
ESI
I would call it a branch circuit, but it cannot be a SABC that is required in the NEC.... This is pretty clear in the NEC. You pick a lot of battles and I think you lose everyone... ;)

Simply read 210.52 (B) (2)
(3) Kitchen Receptacle Requirements. Receptacles installed
in a kitchen to serve countertop surfaces shall be
supplied by not fewer than two small-appliance branch circuits,
either or both of which shall also be permitted to supply
receptacle outlets in the same kitchen and in other rooms
specified in 210.52(B)(1). Additional small-appliance branch
circuits shall be permitted to supply receptacle outlets in the
kitchen
and other rooms specified in 210.52(B)(1). No smallappliance
branch circuit shall serve more than one kitchen.

Whats that mean?
 

stickboy1375

Senior Member
Location
Litchfield, CT
(3) Kitchen Receptacle Requirements. Receptacles installed
in a kitchen to serve countertop surfaces shall be
supplied by not fewer than two small-appliance branch circuits,
either or both of which shall also be permitted to supply
receptacle outlets in the same kitchen and in other rooms
specified in 210.52(B)(1). Additional small-appliance branch
circuits shall be permitted to supply receptacle outlets in the
kitchen
and other rooms specified in 210.52(B)(1). No smallappliance
branch circuit shall serve more than one kitchen.

Whats that mean?
What do you think it means? It means I can have more than the required two SABC's... but they still all follow the same rules. In simple terms I could have my dining room on one SABC, my kitchen counter on the two required SABC, my island on a fourth SABC, but reguardless... they all are required to follow 210.52 (B)
 
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