Kitchen small appliance branch circuit

Merry Christmas

Bbaehre91

Member
Location
Lansing Michigan
Occupation
Electrician
Ok so my question, and I have searched in the code book but I feel it could go either way.
if I have a living room that is next to the kitchen, and the wall that joins them has a half wall. Can I put a plug on the living room side of the half wall that is powered from the kitchen small appliance circuit ?
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
I agree with Dennis, the receptacle would be part of the living room not the kitchen so a kitchen SABC could not be used to power it.
 

Bbaehre91

Member
Location
Lansing Michigan
Occupation
Electrician
If the outlet is serving the living room then you cannot install it on the small appliance branch circuit . 210.52(B)
210.52 I read before asking this question and it does say all those room or similar rooms of the dwelling unit. Nothing really excludes the living room receptacles being on the circuit. Unless I’m reading something wrong but it looks pretty grey to me
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
210.52(B)(1) tells you which rooms can be supplied by a SABC. 210.52(B)(2) tells you that no other rooms can be on that circuit. A living room is not a similar area.

210.52(B) Small Appliances.
(1) Receptacle Outlets Served. In the kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling unit, the two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits required by 210.11(C)(1) shall serve all wall and floor receptacle outlets covered by 210.52(A), all countertop outlets covered by 210.52(C), and receptacle outlets for refrigeration equipment.
Exception No. 1: In addition to the required receptacles specified by 210.52, switched receptacles supplied from a general-purpose branch circuit as defined in 210.70(A)(1), Exception No. 1, shall be permitted.
Exception No. 2: In addition to the required receptacles specified by 210.52, a receptacle outlet to serve a specific appliance shall be permit‐
ted to be supplied from an individual branch circuit rated 15 amperes or greater.
(2) No Other Outlets. The two or more small-appliance branch circuits specified in 210.52(B)(1) shall have no other outlets.
 

suemarkp

Senior Member
Location
Kent, WA
Occupation
Retired Engineer
We changed up our layout since we kind of have two living rooms. Now, the old dining room is a sitting room and the larger living room is the dining room. Kitchen receptacles are allowed in the dining room, so what defines that.

Our new sitting room / old dining room is now noncompliant because the kitchen circuits extend in to it now.
 

Bbaehre91

Member
Location
Lansing Michigan
Occupation
Electrician
210.52(B)(1) tells you which rooms can be supplied by a SABC. 210.52(B)(2) tells you that no other rooms can be on that circuit. A living room is not a similar area.
If you look at 210.52b1 it does say that the 20 amp small appliance branch circuit shall serve all wall and floor receptacle outlets covered in 210.52a which a living room is in that section
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Retired Electrical Contractor
If you look at 210.52b1 it does say that the 20 amp small appliance branch circuit shall serve all wall and floor receptacle outlets covered in 210.52a which a living room is in that section


Yes, it states that but you cannot read that without reading the first part which tells you in which rooms this rule pertains to. It shall serve all wall and floor receptacles covered by 210.52(A) (now insert in those rooms mentioned above)

(B) Small Appliances.
(1) Receptacle Outlets Served. In the kitchen, pantry, breakfast
room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling unit,
the
two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits
required by 210.11(C)(1) shall serve all wall and floor receptacle
outlets covered by 210.52(A), all countertop outlets covered
by 210.52(C), and receptacle outlets for refrigeration equipment.
 

Bbaehre91

Member
Location
Lansing Michigan
Occupation
Electrician
Yes, it states that but you cannot read that without reading the first part which tells you in which rooms this rule pertains to. It shall serve all wall and floor receptacles covered by 210.52(A) (now insert in those rooms mentioned above)
Why wouldn’t you insert the rooms from 210.52a since it says you SHALL service rooms from 210.52a right after listing kitchen, pantry, and dining room
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
If you look at 210.52b1 it does say that the 20 amp small appliance branch circuit shall serve all wall and floor receptacle outlets covered in 210.52a which a living room is in that section
Actually that's not what it says, it has a specific list of rooms that the SABC requirement applies to. Living rooms is not one of them.
 

wwhitney

Senior Member
Location
Berkeley, CA
Occupation
Retired
since it says you SHALL service rooms from 210.52a right after listing kitchen, pantry, and dining room
That's not what 210.52(B)(1) says. The limiter "In the kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, dining room, . . ." applies to the entire SHALL clause. So it is saying that the SABCs shall serve receptacles "In the kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, dining room, . . ." that fall under 210.52(A) or 210.52(C).

Which brings up for me a question: what about a receptacle in a kitchen wall that's over 5.5' above the ground? Does it need to go on an SABC, can't go on an SABC, or doesn't matter?

Cheers, Wayne
 

Bbaehre91

Member
Location
Lansing Michigan
Occupation
Electrician
You've been showed that a couple of times already in the above posts.
Right. Well literally in that same paragraph the SABC shall serve all wall and floor receptacle outlets covered in 210.52a which includes living rooms. As of right now that way I’m reading it is that it is allowed, there’s nothing definitively saying you can’t only someone saying I’m reading it wrong.
 

Bbaehre91

Member
Location
Lansing Michigan
Occupation
Electrician
Right. Well literally in that same paragraph the SABC shall serve all wall and floor receptacle outlets covered in 210.52a which includes living rooms. As of right now that way I’m reading it is that it is allowed, there’s nothing definitively saying you can’t only someone saying I’m reading it wrong.
I’m not on one side or the other about this I just want a definitive answer. There’s nothing I’m reading definitely saying you can, but there is a phrase saying the list of areas in 210.52a SHALL be served by the small appliance circuit
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Retired Electrical Contractor
I’m not on one side or the other about this I just want a definitive answer. There’s nothing I’m reading definitely saying you can, but there is a phrase saying the list of areas in 210.52a SHALL be served by the small appliance circuit


If we haven't convinced you yet then you will either have to accept what we say or do what you want. Many of us made it clear what the formal interpretation is all about. I am not sure more words will satisfy you as you have been shown in different ways why your interpretation is incorrect.
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Retired Electrical Contractor
Maybe the 2020 NEC enhanced interpretation will help

(1) Receptacle Outlets Served.



In the kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling unit, the two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits required by 210.11(C)(1) shall serve all wall and floor receptacle outlets covered by 210.52(A), all countertop outlets covered by 210.52(C), and receptacle outlets for refrigeration equipment.
Exception No. 1:
In addition to the required receptacles specified by 210.52, switched receptacles supplied from a general-purpose 15- or 20-ampere branch circuit as required in 210.70(A)(1), Exception No. 1, shall be permitted.
Exception No. 2:
In addition to the required receptacles specified by 210.52, a receptacle outlet to serve a specific appliance shall be permitted to be supplied from an individual branch circuit rated 15 amperes or greater.
ENHANCED CONTENT
Collapse
The limited exceptions to 210.52(B)(2) keep loads for specific equipment to a minimum so that the majority of the circuit capacity is dedicated to supplying cord-and-plug-connected portable appliance loads. The NEC restricts the loads supplied by these receptacle circuits because the number of cord-and-plug-connected portable appliances used by occupants is generally undetermined. Receptacles and other types of outlets in other locations, such as in cabinets, are not permitted to be connected to the small-appliance branch circuit. Such outlets reduce the capacity to supply portable appliances used at a kitchen counter.
No restriction is placed on the number of outlets connected to a general-lighting or small-appliance branch circuit. The minimum number of receptacle outlets in a room is determined by 210.52(A) based on the room perimeter and on 210.52(C) for counter spaces. Installing more than the required minimum number of receptacle outlets can also help reduce the need for extension cords and cords lying across counters.
The exhibit below illustrates the application of the requirements of 210.52(B)(1), (B)(2), and (B)(3). Only the counter area is required to be supplied by both small-appliance branch circuits. The wall receptacle outlets in the kitchen and dining room are permitted to be supplied by one or both of the circuits as shown in the two diagrams.
201223070850-70HB20e210-27.jpg


Exception No. 1
Switched receptacles supplied from general-purpose 15-ampere branch circuits may be located in kitchens, pantries, breakfast rooms, and similar areas. See 210.70(A) and the exhibit above for details.

Exception No. 2
This exception provides a choice for installing receptacle outlets to supply refrigeration equipment or other specific appliances in a kitchen or similar area. An individual 15-ampere or larger branch circuit can serve this equipment, or it can be included in the 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuit. A receptacle supplying refrigeration equipment is exempt from the GFCI requirements of 210.8 where the receptacle is greater than 6 feet from the edge of any sink and where it is located so that it cannot be used to serve countertop surfaces, as shown in the exhibit above.
 

Bbaehre91

Member
Location
Lansing Michigan
Occupation
Electrician
Maybe the 2020 NEC enhanced interpretation will help

(1) Receptacle Outlets Served.



In the kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, dining room, or similar area of a dwelling unit, the two or more 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuits required by 210.11(C)(1) shall serve all wall and floor receptacle outlets covered by 210.52(A), all countertop outlets covered by 210.52(C), and receptacle outlets for refrigeration equipment.
Exception No. 1:
In addition to the required receptacles specified by 210.52, switched receptacles supplied from a general-purpose 15- or 20-ampere branch circuit as required in 210.70(A)(1), Exception No. 1, shall be permitted.
Exception No. 2:
In addition to the required receptacles specified by 210.52, a receptacle outlet to serve a specific appliance shall be permitted to be supplied from an individual branch circuit rated 15 amperes or greater.
ENHANCED CONTENT
Collapse
The limited exceptions to 210.52(B)(2) keep loads for specific equipment to a minimum so that the majority of the circuit capacity is dedicated to supplying cord-and-plug-connected portable appliance loads. The NEC restricts the loads supplied by these receptacle circuits because the number of cord-and-plug-connected portable appliances used by occupants is generally undetermined. Receptacles and other types of outlets in other locations, such as in cabinets, are not permitted to be connected to the small-appliance branch circuit. Such outlets reduce the capacity to supply portable appliances used at a kitchen counter.
No restriction is placed on the number of outlets connected to a general-lighting or small-appliance branch circuit. The minimum number of receptacle outlets in a room is determined by 210.52(A) based on the room perimeter and on 210.52(C) for counter spaces. Installing more than the required minimum number of receptacle outlets can also help reduce the need for extension cords and cords lying across counters.
The exhibit below illustrates the application of the requirements of 210.52(B)(1), (B)(2), and (B)(3). Only the counter area is required to be supplied by both small-appliance branch circuits. The wall receptacle outlets in the kitchen and dining room are permitted to be supplied by one or both of the circuits as shown in the two diagrams.
201223070850-70HB20e210-27.jpg


Exception No. 1
Switched receptacles supplied from general-purpose 15-ampere branch circuits may be located in kitchens, pantries, breakfast rooms, and similar areas. See 210.70(A) and the exhibit above for details.

Exception No. 2
This exception provides a choice for installing receptacle outlets to supply refrigeration equipment or other specific appliances in a kitchen or similar area. An individual 15-ampere or larger branch circuit can serve this equipment, or it can be included in the 20-ampere small-appliance branch circuit. A receptacle supplying refrigeration equipment is exempt from the GFCI requirements of 210.8 where the receptacle is greater than 6 feet from the edge of any sink and where it is located so that it cannot be used to serve countertop surfaces, as shown in the exhibit above.
Ok! So after re reading it like 6 times it does make sense how it’s worded I think that the SABC only supply’s kitchen, pantry, and dining room under it refers to 210.52a as far as outlet code maybe for the dining room. Either way there are some things I wish were more clear with the code
 
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