LED burning at 277v circuit

Jchamos

Member
Location
Indianapolis
Occupation
Electrician
Hello Guys
We have a job with about 840 2x4 throffers
We have replace all fixtures with a 2x4 50w led panel wired at 277v plus neutral
Now after a day we had 130 plus drivers Fried
And they keep burning few days
Out of 840 fixtures we have replaced 200 plus drivers
Any help would be greatly appreciated
 

retirede

Senior Member
Location
Illinois
What is the voltage rating of the panels (driver)? Have you measured the voltage at the panels?

For example, applying 277 to a driver rated 250V max would probably operate for some (short?) period of time.
 

Jchamos

Member
Location
Indianapolis
Occupation
Electrician
I did , they want me to send them 10 damaged ones
Also voltage at panel is 285v to neutral
I don’t know if that a really big deal ?
 

retirede

Senior Member
Location
Illinois
I did , they want me to send them 10 damaged ones
Also voltage at panel is 285v to neutral
I don’t know if that a really big deal ?
I wonder that too.

I’ve not seen anything with a range of 100-277. More common is 100-250. I alway took that to mean absolute range as opposed to “nominal supply”.

As others stated, let’s see what the manufacturer says.
 

James L

Senior Member
Location
Kansas Cty, Mo, USA
Occupation
Electrician
I wonder that too.

I’ve not seen anything with a range of 100-277. More common is 100-250. I alway took that to mean absolute range as opposed to “nominal supply”.

As others stated, let’s see what the manufacturer says.
It's pretty common to see panels rated at 277v

My first thought was:
I wonder if there's 278 volts being applied.

I saw OP said it's about 285v
I'd bet it's a case of manufacturer pushing the limits of cheap components.
 

James L

Senior Member
Location
Kansas Cty, Mo, USA
Occupation
Electrician
It's possible that it's not a voltage problem.

Not the same lights, but I had a scenario where recessed lights were burning out. Some instantly, some after just a short time.

Turned out there was a manufacturing issue, and the output wires from the driver were pinched when the driver got screwed in place at the factory.

Some would dead short.
Some apparently weren't cut into enough to dead short, but burned out the driver in short order.

I had a fail rate of 1 in 3 on about 200 of them
 

Jchamos

Member
Location
Indianapolis
Occupation
Electrician
It's possible that it's not a voltage problem.

Not the same lights, but I had a scenario where recessed lights were burning out. Some instantly, some after just a short time.

Turned out there was a manufacturing issue, and the output wires from the driver were pinched when the driver got screwed in place at the factory.

Some would dead short.
Some apparently weren't cut into enough to dead short, but burned out the driver in short order.

I had a fail rate of 1 in 3 on about 200 of them
This is just really odd
Hopefully I can find the solution !!!
 

Fred B

Senior Member
Location
Upstate, NY
Occupation
Electrician
I've had some once that mfg had put the wrong driver in or atleast labeled wrong, and they were burning up. Fortunately I only had a couple not 200. Not sure who got the other ones because I'm sure it would have been atleast a half a shift production run.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
What is voltage at luminaire(s)?

if you have a bad neutral, maybe multiwire circuit or a feeder with a bad neutral you maybe not too unbalanced initially, but as more drivers fail unbalancing gets worse and impacts more drivers. The ones that see lower volts are probably fine, the ones that see higher volts is what is likely failing if this is what is going on, but that don't mean it won't change after enough fail the load balancing can be significantly different than it originally was.

285 is pretty common to see around here on what is supposed to be 277 nominal, that is only about 3% above 277 and should be acceptable.
 
Top