light switch in residential bathrooms

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Dennis Alwon

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Again I say, so what if the switch is 6" away or 2' away. Shock from the switch is not the issue here. If it were they would say the switch must be 3' from the tub or something of that nature.

If I use plastic crews would the installation be Okay? I don't think so.
 

Dennis Alwon

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Not on older switches w/o a ground screw.
The fact is the code does not state if the screws, plate, switch, etc are grounded or not anyway. It is allowed, IMO, and it is quite clear. We can all argue all day about what should be allowed but, as I see it, the switch can abut the shower with no strings :grin: attached.
 

jaylectricity

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Massachusetts
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licensed journeyman electrician
If possible to it move it is unsafe.

If not possible to it move it is safe.

Did I miss something?

I may have missed an English class or two because two of those three sentences make no sense.

If I use plastic crews would the installation be Okay? I don't think so.

It seems as if your opinion is that the installation is fine no matter where it is, yet it is not OK if you use plastic screws?
 
You need a switch controlled lighting outlet. The switch is not required to be in the room.`

I'm a little late to this thread but you need to put the dash between wall switch and controlled outlet. 210.70(1)
IMHO that reads you need both the switch and the controlled outlet in every habitable room and bathroom.
 

jwjrw

Senior Member
I'm a little late to this thread but you need to put the dash between wall switch and controlled outlet. 210.70(1)
IMHO that reads you need both the switch and the controlled outlet in every habitable room and bathroom.

I dont think it requires the switch in the room. Just that each room have a wall switch controlled outlet.:D
 

infinity

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I'm a little late to this thread but you need to put the dash between wall switch and controlled outlet. 210.70(1)
IMHO that reads you need both ha the switch and the controlled outlet in every bitable room and bathroom.


Take a look at it again, the switch is not required to be within the room. The requirement is for "one wall switch-controlled lighting outlet", it says nothing about the location of the switch.
 
Take a look at it again, the switch is not required to be within the room. The requirement is for "one wall switch-controlled lighting outlet", it says nothing about the location of the switch.

Thanks for shining some light on what may be a gray area for me. :)

The punction mark (dash) has lead me to believe that at least one wall switch is installed in every habitable room for a controlled lighting outlet of that room.
 

infinity

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Thanks for shining some light on what may be a gray area for me. :)

The punction mark (dash) has lead me to believe that at least one wall switch is installed in every habitable room for a controlled lighting outlet of that room.


Hey if it were my house I would want the switch in the room, but the NEC doesn't really care about what I want. ;)
 

hurk27

Senior Member
Thanks for shining some light on what may be a gray area for me. :)

The punction mark (dash) has lead me to believe that at least one wall switch is installed in every habitable room for a controlled lighting outlet of that room.

And to back up Robs post (not that he needs it:D)

See below in red

90.1 Purpose.
(B) Adequacy. This Code contains provisions that are considered necessary for safety. Compliance therewith and proper maintenance will result in an installation that is essentially free from hazard but not necessarily efficient, convenient, or adequate for good service or future expansion of electrical use.

(C) Intention. This Code is not intended as a design specification or an instruction manual for untrained persons.

And to add to this, if the NEC wanted to require the switch in the room then I think they would have used the wording as they did in 210.70(A)(3):
(3) Storage or Equipment Spaces. For attics, underfloor spaces, utility rooms, and basements, at least one lighting outlet containing a switch or controlled by a wall switch shall be installed where these spaces are used for storage or contain equipment requiring servicing. At least one point of control shall be at the usual point of entry to these spaces. The lighting outlet shall be provided at or near the equipment requiring servicing.
 
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quogueelectric

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Location
new york
And where in the NEC are shower rods covered?

On a job I did, a plumber installing grabbars in a shower ran a 3in deckscrew through the hot conductor in a cable. Believe me it was noticed almost immediately. Thank the lord that the victim was a young healthy surfer as opposed to the grandmother for which the apartment was built. The surfer was hung up for a long time before he could release. I feel that all metalic parts in a shower / tub should be grounded in the next code change.
 

sameguy

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New York
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Master Elec./JW retired
The big question was could the inspector move the switch!
Answer- only if you let him work under your lic.
The intire house could be on one switch, minus the 6 step, hallway, rule.
How is that for lowballing?
 
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