Metal FS box

goldstar

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
I know I'm getting old but I don't remember a roamex connector inside a JB ever being Code compliant. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong.


I was called in to correct some Code violations for a woman who was selling her house. Most of the violations were for GFCI receptacles that her husband tried changing out himself and that ended up not working. The words "line" and "load" are tough concepts to explain to the average HO. Anyway, in at least 2 cases there was a ground wire present in the JB but no actual EGC existed (this FS box was one such instance). I replaced the receptacles with a GFCI and marked the new device as "no equipment ground". I know this is acceptable with devices wired in a K&T installation but not sure about this. Actually tracing out this wiring was not a practical solution at this point in time. Too much junk in the basement and I'm not being paid to move it.
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Location
Henrico County, VA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
I think the installer put the connector inside the box to avoid having to enlarge the hole in the wall.
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Location
Henrico County, VA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
That's not the first time I have seen that. I may have even done it once or twice. Look how nice and tight the clamp is on the cable. There is a trick to doing that.
Not really. Tighten the clamp first, then spin the box on it.
 

hbiss

EC, Westchester, New York NEC: 2014
Location
Hawthorne, New York NEC: 2014
Occupation
EC
An "FS" box to me is a cast iron or steel box with threaded entries. Can be had in either round or rectangular (as above).

The OP's box is commonly called a "Bell box" for the original manufacturer. Kind of like Band-Aid describes adhesive bandage strips.

I know I'm getting old but I don't remember a roamex connector inside a JB ever being Code compliant.
I don't see a problem with it as long as you deduct it from the box capacity like any other clamp.

-Hal
 

tom baker

First Chief Moderator
Staff member
Back to the FS box, F stands for iron, so there is FD, FC, FCC, and many more. Most common to use in industrial locations with RMC. I am not a big fan of bell boxes as the mounting screws corrode unless you use SS
 

jim dungar

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Wisconsin
Occupation
Engineer
Back to the FS box, F stands for iron, so there is FD, FC, FCC, and many more. Most common to use in industrial locations with RMC. I am not a big fan of bell boxes as the mounting screws corrode unless you use SS
When I started, at the distribuor, our region was heavy into the Crouse-Hinds and Appleton terminology
F = Ferrous - cast iron
S = Standard depth
D = Deep depth
C = in and out hubs (like a C condulet)

Over the years I have noticed tradespeople and supply houses not being able to tell the difference between local slang and actual part numbers.
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Location
Henrico County, VA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
I think there's a style designation for each type: one hub, one hub on each end, two hubs on one end, one hub on one end and two on the other, two hubs on each end, etc. Then there are versions with side entrances, too.
 

JohnE

Senior Member
Location
Milford, MA
So is there a consensus on whether this is a code violation? Pertaining to the connector being inside the box, vs outside. I've done that type of install many years ago. I believe some would argue that the clamp is for dry locations, that is not the road I want to discuss.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
I don't see a problem other than the clamping mechanism is on the inside so a 1 conductor deduction is required for the box fill calculation. I'm guessing that the hub is only listed for RMC or IMC.
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Location
Henrico County, VA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
I use those connectors, but I make the first 1/2" or so of the hole large enough for the connector to fit, and I apply a thick ring of caulk around it.
 
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