MLO Lighting Panel Pics

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wbalsam1

Senior Member
Location
Upper Jay, NY
If that's a 400 amp service, I take it there are a few more panels? looks nice though.
You're right. There are 2 200 ampere 208/120 power panels, 1 for the washing machines and another for the dryers, etc. This 100 ampere MLO lighting panel is fed from the dryer panelboard.

Thanks for the kind comment. :)

(I straightened up the wiring a little more before I put the covers on).
 

celtic

Senior Member
Location
NJ
What's with all the various colors???

Feed is typical: Black, red, blue.

Branch circuits are: red, brown, purple, yellow, orange, black, etc .....all mixed on whatever phase they happened to reach..
 

wbalsam1

Senior Member
Location
Upper Jay, NY
What's with all the various colors???

Feed is typical: Black, red, blue.

Branch circuits are: red, brown, purple, yellow, orange, black, etc .....all mixed on whatever phase they happened to reach..
My feeder to the MLO was Black/Red/Blue

I had a color scheme worked out to make the job easier. For single phase BC's, brown was used for those circuits for lighting in offices, bathroom, electrical room and service areas behind equipment. Purple was used for GFCI-protected circuits; red for boiler, fire alarm and exit light circuits; orange for electric door and catv and plasma tv; yellow for various vending machines, dollar/change and soap; the list goes on and on. All circuits are identified on a well-typed circuit directory on the inside panel door.

For 3-phase washers and dryers, I used black/red/blue and even though they're all 208, I used brown/orange/yellow as an alternate BC coloring when I switched from one size washer or dryer to another.

All J-Boxes are identified as to what they contain and their circuit colors. Anyone trouble shooting in the years ahead will be thankful for all the "clues" I left for them. :)

The job actually had very little colored wire spools left over as everything was carefully thought out and ordered. Not a lot to take back to the shop.

:)
 

walton

Member
Location
Sacramento, CA
I know it's not an NEC requirement but I always installed 120/208 circuits - black, red, blue, white and 277/480 circuits - brown, orange, yellow, grey. Phased accordingly. I learned my trade in an industrial setting and we would never mix colors.
 

Jim W in Tampa

Senior Member
Location
Tampa Florida
Looks good, but really don't trust small but splices. Would rather see wire nuts. I think i would rather see labels from a label maker, or a typed up schedule. Overall it looks far better than many we see posted here.
 

iMuse97

Senior Member
Location
Chicagoland
I know it's not an NEC requirement but I always installed 120/208 circuits - black, red, blue, white and 277/480 circuits - brown, orange, yellow, grey. Phased accordingly. I learned my trade in an industrial setting and we would never mix colors.
I've worked for companies that would never vary from what you describe, even using only red and black in a 120/240 1Ph panel. And I've worked for companies where any color will do for branch circuits as long as it is not green, white, or natural grey. I've gotten more rigid over the years and go with the "standardized color scheme" --even though there is no standard. :)
 

Jim W in Tampa

Senior Member
Location
Tampa Florida
I will usually only use the standard blk,red, blue and BOY. Keeps confusion down for everyone so just make it a habbit but nothing wrong in making the panel this way as long as no shared neutrals.
 

wbalsam1

Senior Member
Location
Upper Jay, NY
Looks good, but really don't trust small but splices. Would rather see wire nuts. I think i would rather see labels from a label maker, or a typed up schedule. Overall it looks far better than many we see posted here.
I've provided a really neat, typed circuit directory fastened to the inside door of the panel cover. I've taken all the temporary white tape labels off the CBs. I was careful not to penetrate the plastic of the butt splice, yet get a good solid splice...hope it's alright, if not, I'll use wirenuts.
 

wbalsam1

Senior Member
Location
Upper Jay, NY
You've still got it! :grin: Whatever it is...:cool: Nice pictures; very nice job, and thanks for posting.:)
Thank you.

(I would never have used a brown/orange/yellow combination for 208/120 circuits in this building if it was served with a 480/277. I would have reserved these colors for the higher voltage.) :)
 

rt66electric

Senior Member
Location
Oklahoma
Butt splices??

Butt splices??

Looks good, but really don't trust small but splices. Would rather see wire nuts. I think i would rather see labels from a label maker, or a typed up schedule. Overall it looks far better than many we see posted here.
I like the well-done neat wiring job. I have never seen or used butt splice on commercial work( execpt once on a tear-out and it was hidden in a conduit run).
I know most inspector would look at you funny, are buttsplices approved by NEC??
 

iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
I had a color scheme worked out to make the job easier. For single phase BC's, brown was used for those circuits for lighting in offices, bathroom, electrical room and service areas behind equipment. Purple was used for GFCI-protected circuits; red for boiler, fire alarm and exit light circuits; orange for electric door and catv and plasma tv; yellow for various vending machines, dollar/change and soap; the list goes on and on. All circuits are identified on a well-typed circuit directory on the inside panel door.
I assume there is only one voltage system in the building?

See 210.5(C)
 

wbalsam1

Senior Member
Location
Upper Jay, NY
I like the well-done neat wiring job. I have never seen or used butt splice on commercial work( execpt once on a tear-out and it was hidden in a conduit run).
I know most inspector would look at you funny, are buttsplices approved by NEC??
Yes, they are approved. They are listed for the purpose and provide a thorough electrical connection as required by 110.14. :)
 
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