NEC 2020 210.63 B and NEC 210.8 B (E) GFCIs

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
As mentioned GFCI protection is in 210.8. Here's the sections mentioned in the OP:
210.63(B)(1) Indoor Service Equipment.
The required receptacle outlet shall be located within the same room or area as the service equipment.
210.63(B)(2) Indoor Equipment Requiring Dedicated Equipment Spaces.
Where equipment, other than service equipment, requires dedicated equipment space as specified in 110.26(E), the required receptacle outlet shall be located within the same room or area as the electrical equipment and shall not be connected to the load side of the equipment’s branch-circuit disconnecting means.
 

mke

Member
Location
Hawaii
Occupation
Engineer
Could someone clarify the NEC 210.63 (B) (2) requirement for the receptacle ..."shall not be connected the load side of the equipment's branch-circuit disconnecting means". A panelboard is "equipment" that requires dedicated equipment space. Does this mean the receptacle cannot be connected to the panelboard? What if this is the only 208/120V panelboard you have? It seems like this may have been meant for other types of equipment, but 110.26 (E) is for panelboards, etc.
 

Greentagger

Senior Member
Location
Texas
Occupation
Master Electrician, Electrical Inspector
Could someone clarify the NEC 210.63 (B) (2) requirement for the receptacle ..."shall not be connected the load side of the equipment's branch-circuit disconnecting means". A panelboard is "equipment" that requires dedicated equipment space. Does this mean the receptacle cannot be connected to the panelboard? What if this is the only 208/120V panelboard you have? It seems like this may have been meant for other types of equipment, but 110.26 (E) is for panelboards, etc.
The reference is not to come off the load side of a 250 V branch circuit for mechanical equipment and bootleg an egc and try to make a home brew 120V circuit.
 

mke

Member
Location
Hawaii
Occupation
Engineer
The reference is not to come off the load side of a 250 V branch circuit for mechanical equipment and bootleg an egc and try to make a home brew 120V circuit.
Thanks. This is what I was thinking the intent was, but NEC 210.63 (B)(@) notes that the "equipment" that requires dedicated equipment space as specified in 110.26(E). 110.26(E) is for switchboards, switchgear, panelboards, and motor control centers.
 
Thanks. This is what I was thinking the intent was, but NEC 210.63 (B)(@) notes that the "equipment" that requires dedicated equipment space as specified in 110.26(E). 110.26(E) is for switchboards, switchgear, panelboards, and motor control centers.
I too see 110.26(E) as panelboards not mechanical equipment.

I did not think about having a main service in one room with only 277/480V and another room with only 120/208V.

In general, I am too reading that the receptacle in an electrical room must be fed from another panel (other than main electrical room with service equipment). You could have two panels in the room with two receptacles and meet the code as I read it.
 

NTesla76

Senior Member
Location
IA
I too see 110.26(E) as panelboards not mechanical equipment.

I did not think about having a main service in one room with only 277/480V and another room with only 120/208V.

In general, I am too reading that the receptacle in an electrical room must be fed from another panel (other than main electrical room with service equipment). You could have two panels in the room with two receptacles and meet the code as I read it.
I think I agree with you. If a piece of equipment is disconnected, the receptacle still needs to be energized, thus fed from another panel.
 
I think I agree with you. If a piece of equipment is disconnected, the receptacle still needs to be energized, thus fed from another panel.
And if the piece of "equipment" is Panelboard A in electrical room 1 then there needs to be a GFCI receptacle in electrical room 1 fed from a different panel (Panelboard B). It can not be fed from Panelboard A to meet the requirements for Panelboard A.


- If Panelboard B is in electrical room 1, then you would need a GFCI receptacle from each panelboard in the same room.

Does all that sound right?
 

david luchini

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Connecticut
Occupation
Engineer
And if the piece of "equipment" is Panelboard A in electrical room 1 then there needs to be a GFCI receptacle in electrical room 1 fed from a different panel (Panelboard B). It can not be fed from Panelboard A to meet the requirements for Panelboard A.


- If Panelboard B is in electrical room 1, then you would need a GFCI receptacle from each panelboard in the same room.

Does all that sound right?
I think if A and B are in the same electrical room, one GFCI receptacle fed from a panel not located in the same electrical room would suffice.
 
I think if A and B are in the same electrical room, one GFCI receptacle fed from a panel not located in the same electrical room would suffice.
Good point. I am just glad I have some agreement that code section is talking about panels.

The only part of the language I would want revise is where it says the "equipment's branch circuit". I would want it to include somewhere the words "feeder circuit". A typical piece of 110.26 (E) equipment (panelboard) has a feeder circuit on its load side and branch & feeder circuits on it's line side.
 
Top