NEC receptacle

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infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
Should be a standard GFCI receptacle.

 

hillbilly1

Senior Member
Location
Atlanta,Ga
Occupation
Field coordinator/ technical support
Yes, gfci receptacles break both the neutral and hot, hence two pole. On a side note, it’s easier on troubleshooting, as if the dead circuit has no continuity to the equipment ground, nine out of ten times it’s a tripped receptacle somewhere.
 

Rock86

Senior Member
Location
new york
Occupation
Electrical Engineer / Electrician
That seems like a weird way to have it spec'd. Is that from the factory or designer? Although I agree with hillbilly1's statement, i don't like the term 2-pole for a 120v circuit. and 3-wire... if they are talking about Black White Green(bare) okay.. but that is like a homedepot phrase IMO.
 

don_resqcapt19

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Illinois
Occupation
retired electrician
The Hubbell version of the NEMA plug and receptacle chart shows them like that. A 2 wire device is 2 pole, 2 wire device and one with an EGC is 2 pole, 3 wire on their chart.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
That seems like a weird way to have it spec'd. Is that from the factory or designer? Although I agree with hillbilly1's statement, i don't like the term 2-pole for a 120v circuit. and 3-wire... if they are talking about Black White Green(bare) okay.. but that is like a homedepot phrase IMO.
Ever look at plug/receptacle selection charts? They often classified that way.

Two pole three wire means two current carrying and one grounding conductor

Three pole four wire means three current carrying and one grounding conductor

Three pole three wire, non grounding would be like the old three wire range and dryer receptacles.
 

Malywr

Member
Location
New Jersey USA
That seems like a weird way to have it spec'd. Is that from the factory or designer? Although I agree with hillbilly1's statement, i don't like the term 2-pole for a 120v circuit. and 3-wire... if they are talking about Black White Green(bare) okay.. but that is like a homedepot phrase IMO.

OP set 2pole and ask if that is 120v
If that is 2 pole (208-250v)regular receptacle 120v is no good and needs GFCI disconnect or GFCI breaker
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
OP set 2pole and ask if that is 120v
If that is 2 pole (208-250v)regular receptacle 120v is no good and needs GFCI disconnect or GFCI breaker
OP needs to clarify. Kind of indicates it says 2 pole 3 wire, 120 volt. But then adds the question mark and we not really sure if he is quoting or asking.

2 pole 3 wire, 120 volt (proper should be 125 volt) would be 5-15, 5-20, L5-20...

2 pole 3 wire 250 volt would be 6-15, 6-20, L6-20...

OP doesn't state voltage other than 120 followed by a question mark.

Also would be very rare for a RTU to require a cord and plug connection adding even more questions or confusion here.
 

hillbilly1

Senior Member
Location
Atlanta,Ga
Occupation
Field coordinator/ technical support
OP needs to clarify. Kind of indicates it says 2 pole 3 wire, 120 volt. But then adds the question mark and we not really sure if he is quoting or asking.

2 pole 3 wire, 120 volt (proper should be 125 volt) would be 5-15, 5-20, L5-20...

2 pole 3 wire 250 volt would be 6-15, 6-20, L6-20...

OP doesn't state voltage other than 120 followed by a question mark.

Also would be very rare for a RTU to require a cord and plug connection adding even more questions or confusion here.

The receptacle is probably for servicing the RTU as required by code. As for two pole 120, remember code considers the neutral a “hot” wire once it leaves the service.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
The receptacle is probably for servicing the RTU as required by code. As for two pole 120, remember code considers the neutral a “hot” wire once it leaves the service.
Could be, like I said some clarification is needed because what was described isn't all that typical assuming it means what it appears to say.
 

Rock86

Senior Member
Location
new york
Occupation
Electrical Engineer / Electrician
Could be, like I said some clarification is needed because what was described isn't all that typical assuming it means what it appears to say.
I agree with all of whats being said... but Infinity made the clearest point in his 1st post with the link. The link clearly states in the specifications that the GFCI receptacle is 2 pole, 3 wire. damn terminology hahaha
 

Malywr

Member
Location
New Jersey USA
The receptacle is probably for servicing the RTU as required by code. As for two pole 120, remember code considers the neutral a “hot” wire once it leaves the service.

120V is not single pole ?
Single pole one ungrounded wire and neutral
2 pole. 2 ungrounded wired
3 pole 3 ungrounded wires
2 pole 120/250V. 2 ungrounded wires and neutral



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jap

Senior Member
Ever look at plug/receptacle selection charts? They often classified that way.

Two pole three wire means two current carrying and one grounding conductor

Three pole four wire means three current carrying and one grounding conductor

Three pole three wire, non grounding would be like the old three wire range and dryer receptacles.

Correct.

This is all pretty common stuff.

JAP>
 
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