Need some opinions

Merry Christmas

nickelec

Senior Member
Location
US
I have a client / architect who is trying to install these outlets. I'm saying no go do tie the box behind the plate not being accessable. I don't see the small opening that the cap goes into being big enough to give access .. thoughts?
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infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
At $200 a pop, ouch. They do sell a removal tool that looks like it would allow the receptacle to be pulled out of the hole.

. Outlets sit flush with the wall surface for greater visual subtlety. The 22.1 tool is required to access the wiring after installation. UL approved.
 

nickelec

Senior Member
Location
US
Yes you can remove the receptacle from the hole but still I don't see that as giving access to any splices behind the plate

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nickelec

Senior Member
Location
US
They want to put a full stone backsplash on top of the plate so basically install everything then cut the stone to just expose the receptacle leaving no access to the 4 screws that attach the plate to the box

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infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
From the instruction sheet it appears that you pull the receptacle out of the hole to access the splices inside of the box, the cover cannot be removed with the stone in place.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
Yes, NEC approved on your opinion?
Good question, it is UL listed so I would say yes. Given the size of the hole I would think that it might be tough to use that with more than one cable in the box especially with #12 solid conductors. I would seriously consider using stranded conductors.
 

brantmacga

Señor Member
Location
Georgia
Occupation
Electrical Monke
I saw these recently in the background of a Matt risinger video and wondered what they were.

If it’s possible to move the junction boxes to below the countertop surface, I would suggest using a Legrand furniture power center cut into the stone.


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gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Professional Engineer, Fire & Life Safety
Good question, it is UL listed so I would say yes. Given the size of the hole I would think that it might be tough to use that with more than one cable in the box especially with #12 solid conductors. I would seriously consider using stranded conductors.
UL doesn't mean NEC compliant. I checked their video and looked at the removal tool, and all you get is access to the wiring for the receptacle itself, no access to the box. If you had a metal box behind there and the ground came loose, how could you fix it? Suppose you get an overload somehow (or lightning strike) and you need to replace the cables, how do you manage? I can't see this being compliant, but you can always run it by your AHJ and see what he/she thinks.
 

winnie

Senior Member
Location
Springfield, MA, USA
Occupation
Electric motor research
IMHO if the architect is willing to write the specs on the back of a large enough check, you can do this.

Clearly pulling the receptacle out does not provide the necessary access to the box behind the receptacle. But if you re-do the rough, and move the splices to a different location where you do have access, then I don't see a problem. Put the box behind a panel in the cabinet, or on the opposite wall, and then do the wiring to the receptacle like a wet-niche in a pool. You open the box that might be 3 feet away, work on the splices, and then have a long unspliced set of wires going to the receptacle.

-Jon
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
Why do you think that the splices are not accessible through the round hole? Certainly it's designed that way and has be tested and listed by UL.
 

nickelec

Senior Member
Location
US
Well given the fact that these are intended for use on a countertop in the instance . There will be #12 solid conductrs inside a metal box with a two gang adapter I jsut Dont think that i would be able to access the screw on the bonding jumper and or all the splices inside the box

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480sparky

Senior Member
Location
Iowegia
They want to put a full stone backsplash on top of the plate so basically install everything then cut the stone to just expose the receptacle leaving no access to the 4 screws that attach the plate to the box

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I'm sure the folks installing the stone are gonna hate 'em too, as they have to be dead-on with every hole.
 
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