New house

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Hard to do (price wise) today with all the AFCI/GFCI requirements. Oh and the wire prices don't help either.
If running two circuits to each room yes. If running two circuits but to multiple rooms maybe not.

At very least I tend to put receptacles on opposite sides of a wall between two bedrooms on same circuit instead of having an individual circuit for each room. But I tend to run 12 AWG for nearly all receptacles and will put maybe three bedrooms all on same circuit and run 15 amp circuits for lighting for a pretty significant area of the house, since the lighting got more efficient in recent years those 15 amp lighting only circuits kind of can do an entire floor in most houses. I tend to still split them up a little more though, at least two circuits on a particular floor level in most cases.
 

Jpflex

Senior Member
Location
Victorville
Occupation
Electrician commercial and residential
The load calc section at 3 watts/ sq foot would allow 480 square feet for a 15 amp circuit
3VA per square foot is for general lighting and load calculation but I didn’t see where the code said there was a limit to the number of rooms per breaker or circuit.

Additionally the code allows 15 amp receptacles on 20 amp circuit with multiple receptacles because it is assumed not all receptacles will be used at once or exceed ampacity limits with connected load.

Last few houses I wired lighting and receptacles separate with 20 ampere breakers on yellow 12-2 romex for receptacles each room per 1 breaker as portable heaters use between 10 to 15 amperes each and take up nearly entire circuit ampacity, therefore I would not recommend wiring too many rooms on 1 breaker.

With modern LED lights only using 0.001 - 0.1 ampere, I wired 4 rooms with one 15 ampere breaker. Used 14-2 white romex

The later places limits on motor loads
 

Jpflex

Senior Member
Location
Victorville
Occupation
Electrician commercial and residential
I meant wiring lighting loads on the same circuit of power receptacles places limits on motors - code
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I meant wiring lighting loads on the same circuit of power receptacles places limits on motors - code
Practicality of use limits for portable motor loads yes. Fixed in place motor loads, even if cord and plug connected, has some considerations already in code that may limit whether you can have lighting or general purpose outlets on with said motor load. Good design practices may still go beyond code minimum requirements though.
 

Amps

Electrical Contractor
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Electrical, Security, Networks and Everything Else.
I would educate the customer about the above deficiency and strongly suggest they correct it. It totally depends on the safety concerns of the violation.
And have the work done inspected.
 

Jpflex

Senior Member
Location
Victorville
Occupation
Electrician commercial and residential
That's not how it works.
You can have multiple rooms per breaker circuit but don’t go crazzy with too many.

Also find out what the customer will be using because I’ve experienced customers tripping breakers while having the microwave and portable heaters on 2 adjacent rooms on the same circuit. Portable heaters use 12 amps or more so I would not wire too many rooms on same circuit but perhaps 2?
 

Jpflex

Senior Member
Location
Victorville
Occupation
Electrician commercial and residential
I would not base loading a bedroom off
portable heaters.
They should have a permanent form of heat.
Those portable burn out receptacle all the time.
However the houses I am referring to do not have a permanent form of heat because they are built way out in the desert and only to house employees on company mining site
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I would not base loading a bedroom off
portable heaters.
They should have a permanent form of heat.
Those portable burn out receptacle all the time.
Especially not on new construction, there is no reason not to have sufficient HVAC already planned on new construction, especially a permanent dwelling. Some bunk house or similar maybe you have more crude HVAC in the plans, but if new you should know you need to plan for it in your branch circuits.

It is old houses that maybe don't have HVAC for a second floor or an addition covered all that well that you may need to account for portable units or even window units if you happen to be doing some sort of rewire.
 
Top