Override/ Master switch

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kjw444

Member
Location
detroit, mi
I'm trying to use a switch to control a mechanically held, normally closed lighting contacter. Basically the customer wants to hop in bed and hit a override switch to turn off the lights. The problem is if they wake up in the morning and forget to hit the override, the lights won't work when they return in the dark. Without using low voltage or a lighting control system what are my options?
 

nakulak

Senior Member
timeclock, photocell, remote control master switch, clapper, anything you can imagine. just make it well thought out. nothing like waking up to a fire and all the lights don't work because someone designed an idiotic system. what about if someone is sleeping in a guestroom ? anyhow, like I said, think it out thoroughly.
 

kjw444

Member
Location
detroit, mi
Its only in the bed room, not the whole house. It's 1200 sp ft. about 8 cans 40' track multiple switched outlets. They want to lay down hit a switch and forget about it.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
You could use all momentary contact override switches and a momentary contact time clock.
 

1793

Senior Member
I'm trying to use a switch to control a mechanically held, normally closed lighting contacter. Basically the customer wants to hop in bed and hit a override switch to turn off the lights. The problem is if they wake up in the morning and forget to hit the override, the lights won't work when they return in the dark. Without using low voltage or a lighting control system what are my options?

What is controlling the contactor? Are the lights on all of the time and the HO wants to turn them off when they get into bed?
 

kjw444

Member
Location
detroit, mi
I thought about that but there is going to be about four circuits which are switched independently. At this point I'm starting to think I need a low voltage system.
 

quinn77

Senior Member
couldnt you put the contactor in parallel ( given it is economically feasable ) with the circuits, controlling a 120 volt coil with a timer, and a master switch (timer bypass) in parallel with the timer?

ps...why a n.c. contactor?

quinn
 

nakulak

Senior Member
maybe you could run a master shouter driving four zones of clappers. (for those of you that haven't seen the shouter on robot chicken, you shout something like "my kids hate me" and it turns off)
 

Mike01

Senior Member
Location
MidWest
small networked panel

small networked panel

by the time it's all said and done (equipment cost / wiring / installation) would it not just be easier to install a small relay panel (peanut panel, lc&d, etc) you can get "economy" style ones pretty inexpensive by the time you take into account the equiment / wiring / installation cost of a traditional method also wall space for a contactor / time clock etc., also if they change their mind, or the way it's set up it's all programming. just a thought.
 

quinn77

Senior Member
by the time it's all said and done (equipment cost / wiring / installation) would it not just be easier to install a small relay panel (peanut panel, lc&d, etc) you can get "economy" style ones pretty inexpensive by the time you take into account the equiment / wiring / installation cost of a traditional method also wall space for a contactor / time clock etc., also if they change their mind, or the way it's set up it's all programming. just a thought.

thanx mike,
dont do alot of resi, but this peanut panel i like...good idea, looks to be the most practical.

quinn
 

benaround

Senior Member
Location
Arizona
quinn,

When I was a kid, I had a 'delay' switch in my bedroom. It replaced the regular single pole

switch, when you turned it off it would still stay on for about 1 min. then 'click' it would

turn the lights off.

I'd bet they still sell them, and guess at $20 or less.
 

kjw444

Member
Location
detroit, mi
maybe you could run a master shouter driving four zones of clappers. (for those of you that haven't seen the shouter on robot chicken, you shout something like "my kids hate me" and it turns off)

N.C. because I want the wall switches to work as normal, I only want the override to open the circuits, but also still have the wall switches operational if that makes sense.
 

steve66

Senior Member
Location
Illinois
Occupation
Engineer
Circuit the lights through a scale placed under one of the bed legs. You lay down, the lights go off. You get up, they come on. :grin:

If only lighting controls were that easy.....
 

ultramegabob

Senior Member
Location
Indiana
I think a master switch in the bedroom is a bad design if there is more than just one person living there, if someone else gets up in another room they wont be able to turn lights on. If they insist on a master switch, I would push for installing nightlights that came on with a photoeye to illuminate walkways, or just use occupancy sensors where they are concerned with leaving lights on accidentally.
 

btharmy

Senior Member
Location
Indiana
How about two 2pole momentary switches (up latch, down un-latch) wired in paralel. One by the bed and one by the door. If they forget to turn the lights on in the morning, they can turn them on when they enter the room in the evening.
 

1793

Senior Member
Circuit the lights through a scale placed under one of the bed legs. You lay down, the lights go off. You get up, they come on. :grin:

If only lighting controls were that easy.....

I was thinking about a pressure plate, switch, on the floor by the bed.





One problem would be getting up in the middle of the night to use the rest room. :)
 

SAC

Senior Member
Location
Massachusetts
You could use X10 remote control switches and have a controller at the bedside. Most controllers will have an All On - All Off switch which would allow you to have individual control as well as an overall control.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X10_(industry_standard)

I agree, X10 can do what is being asked for (and more). While the switches and lighting controllers are more expensive (and dimming modules can be especially expensive), special wiring is not generally required. The bedside controller is a nice touch vs. a hardwired switch, as people may re-arrange the furniture over time.
 

kjw444

Member
Location
detroit, mi
Just another thought. Since the contact will control bedroom lighting will it trip the afci? I have never used a contact in a bedroom so I'm not sure
 
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