Patch Panel

jim3394

Member
I am doing a small office ethernet install. Is there any reason not to terminate plugs directly on the end for the ethernet switch as opposed to terminating to 110 block and using patch cords? Thanks
 

zbang

Senior Member
They're eventually break and need to be reterminated. With a patch panel, you replace the patch cord.
 

stevebea

Senior Member
I am doing a small office ethernet install. Is there any reason not to terminate plugs directly on the end for the ethernet switch as opposed to terminating to 110 block and using patch cords? Thanks
It has alot to do with cable management. It's much easier to terminate 50 cat.5 on a patch panel and make it look neat vs. using RJ45 modular plugs and and going directly to the switch. It's also much faster to terminate on a patch panel than it is to install modular plugs. Another consideration, if a cat.5 were to be yanked on I would rather punch down again than risk damaging a switch port.
 

Barndog

Senior Member
We use to use 110 blocks then plug patches into them. Now we make our ends right on the cable. I think it is easier to just put the ends on the cables and we have not had very many if any instances where a cable needs to have another end put on them.
 
You can certainly do whatever seems simplest and cheapest, now. But, look ahead a few years and consider how difficult it will be to expand this 'hardwired' layout. Even something as simple as moving a plug to a different jack on the same router may be impossible without a Cat 5 coupler.

It may be neat now, but, any moves, adds or changes will get real ugly real fast. Perhaps this client will never expand their network beyond this point, but, what if they do? Will you then feel like punching down the old horizontal wire (presuming there's still room in the closet for a punchdown block)?
 

stevebea

Senior Member
You can certainly do whatever seems simplest and cheapest, now. But, look ahead a few years and consider how difficult it will be to expand this 'hardwired' layout. Even something as simple as moving a plug to a different jack on the same router may be impossible without a Cat 5 coupler.

It may be neat now, but, any moves, adds or changes will get real ugly real fast. Perhaps this client will never expand their network beyond this point, but, what if they do? Will you then feel like punching down the old horizontal wire (presuming there's still room in the closet for a punchdown block)?
Agreed, if there is the slightest chance of future expansion its the right thing to do!
 
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