POE powers LED lighting

anbm

Senior Member
I recently saw some articles about POE powers LED lighting, does anyone know if this technology has been approved, UL list and code compliance? How does this work with emergency lighting? I do not see a lot of light vendors offering the light products to work with this new technology. Anyone has any experiences? One of our clients asked us about it. Pros and cons vs traditional wiring installation? i.e. hard pipes and wiring.
 

Besoeker3

Senior Member
Location
UK
Occupation
Electrical Engineer
I recently saw some articles about POE powers LED lighting, does anyone know if this technology has been approved, UL list and code compliance? How does this work with emergency lighting? I do not see a lot of light vendors offering the light products to work with this new technology. Anyone has any experiences? One of our clients asked us about it. Pros and cons vs traditional wiring installation? i.e. hard pipes and wiring.

PoE technology for LED lighting delivers benefits beyond ...​

https://www.ledsmagazine.com › leds-ssl-design › article

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3 Sept 2015 — Today, you can provide the DC power to LED lamps with PoE technology, which is regulated by the IEEE 802.3 standard, originally released in 2003 ...
 

hillbilly1

Senior Member
Location
Atlanta,Ga
Occupation
Field coordinator/ technical support
Commscope has had “Redwood” out for quite a few years now. I believe they bought that company many years ago. Haven’t seen a building done in it yet, but I imagine there is some out there. Did a telephone switching facility many years ago that had all their emergency lighting on 48 vdc so it could run of the plant batteries, but it was all pipe and wire, not POE.
 

mikeames

Senior Member
Location
Germantown MD
Occupation
Teacher - Master Electrician - 2017 NEC
Commscope has had “Redwood” out for quite a few years now. I believe they bought that company many years ago. Haven’t seen a building done in it yet, but I imagine there is some out there.
He he, I worked for Redwood before Commscope bought them (wow, that was a while ago). Actually a fairly good idea/design, and specifically managed the outputs to maintain Class 2 (IIRC, each pair was limited to 20 watts, and one fixture could be powered by up to not-parallelled 3 pairs). There were at least a 10 large installations that I can recall (mostly data centers).
 
Exactly what it says, one fixture can have multiple pairs that are used individually, not paralleled into a single set. In the Redwood system, there could be up to three drivers connected to three separate LED strings in the fixture, and the drivers are operated as a single unit (they all output the same voltage/current).
 
Location
Oklahoma, United States
Occupation
Lighting Specification Sales
The PoE power source would have to be listed to UL 924 for it to be permitted to provide the power for emergency lighting.
Unsure of any other PoE system manufacturers that have the UL 924 listing. There might be other manufacturers that have this too, this is just the only one I am semi-familiar with at the moment. Still early in my education on these systems.

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