Porch light ocpd

mavrck

Member
Location
ky
I’m adding a few led can lights outside under a porch roof. Does anyone have the code reference on what ocpd is required. GFCI or AFCI. Thank you
 

mavrck

Member
Location
ky
Yes this a new circuit
I’m using version 2020 nec
Yes I’m asking about ocpd (over current protection device)/ breaker. Do they need to be gfci protected or arc fault protected like every other circuit in a house.
 

Fred B

Senior Member
Location
Upstate, NY
Occupation
Electrician
Yes this a new circuit
I’m using version 2020 nec
Yes I’m asking about ocpd (over current protection device)/ breaker. Do they need to be gfci protected or arc fault protected like every other circuit in a house.
Risidential? Outside to my knowledge if ceiling is not an open air(no roof), then no special requirements for GFCI. But AFCI, here is where there is arguements. Some inspectors say if the switch is in an area that is listed as requiring AFCI protection then those outside lighting circuit has to have AFCI, claims that the switch is a "devices" per 210.12(A). (And look at Article 100 definitions of device). Others will disagree and say nothing needed for outside spaces. So where is your switch?
From my reading of 210.12(A) (NEC 2017) if the switch (a device) is by your door in a space listed you must provide AFCI protection. If you put the switch outside on porch it would appear to be a "get around", but then depending on exposure might need a wheather tight or inuse cover. This exception for AFCI doesn't make sense to me in that the wireing and enclosure is in the same wall just exposed on opposite side so to me poses the same risks, same for a bathroom that does not require and AFCI protection but the wires for bath run thru same space as other wireing that must have AFCI due to the location. (Ie. Bedroom wall receptacle adjacent to bath must be AFCI but the receptacle in bath that might even be back to back with the one in bedroom doesn't need it.) Don't get it.
 

mavrck

Member
Location
ky
Thank you that makes sense . So basically it’s not always about where your fixtures are it can also be relative to the switching device.
I primarily do commercial and industrial so I’m trying to get caught back up on residential code .

This off topic but is there any specific code for smoke detectors in residential? I haven’t had any luck locating it.
 

Fred B

Senior Member
Location
Upstate, NY
Occupation
Electrician
Thank you that makes sense . So basically it’s not always about where your fixtures are it can also be relative to the switching device.
I primarily do commercial and industrial so I’m trying to get caught back up on residential code .

This off topic but is there any specific code for smoke detectors in residential? I haven’t had any luck locating it.
Smoke detectors are primarily building/fire code issue. AFA electrical code they would require AFCI, all wiring must be done to any applicable code for size, terminations, box sizeing etc., but beyond that code doesn't say much as you found. Around here the building inspectors require 1 smoke in each bedroom and one in hallway outside bedrooms, one on each level of residence and one CO on each level, can be a combo smoke CO. Again building code not NEC.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Thank you that makes sense . So basically it’s not always about where your fixtures are it can also be relative to the switching device.
I primarily do commercial and industrial so I’m trying to get caught back up on residential code .

This off topic but is there any specific code for smoke detectors in residential? I haven’t had any luck locating it.
Placement or need for smoke detectors is not an NEC issue, but wiring of them still needs to comply with general rules of NEC, particularly chapters 1-4. Chances are very high you will have detectors in areas that require AFCI protection in accordance with general rules, and if interconnected you will ultimately end up with AFCI protection of the entire circuit even if some detectors are in areas that don't require AFCI protection.
 
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