Recessed Can type lighting for new construction

JoeNorm

Senior Member
Hello,

I plan to install a few low profile ceiling lights in a new house. They will be recessed LED type similar to traditional cans but without the can. My question is whether it is best to mount a round plastic J-box for each light or just loop romex and drill the ceiling later and mount in the drywall?

Any advantages or disadvantages to either method?

thanks
 

Little Bill

Moderator
Staff member
I use two different type of LED disc lights, one goes on a box and the other just clips in the ceiling and has its own junction box. I prefer the one that clips in the ceiling. I like them because you can place them better after the drywall/ceiling is up. Even if you run into a joist you can pretty much put it there. I just leave a loop or whip for each light on the rough. I like the other ones for retro fit if there is a box already there. Or cut a hole and use a remodel box.
 

480sparky

Senior Member
I really dig these:

Topaz 4" recessed LED.

Model RDL/4RND/9/CTS-97. Just cut the same size hole as a 4" round box, has it's own j-box attached to the driver, and attaches super-easy to the drywall. Choose 2700, 3000 or 4000K right on the unit.
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Those canless/boxless LED lights are great to install! :thumbsup:
 

synchro

Senior Member
I really dig these:

Topaz 4" recessed LED.

Model RDL/4RND/9/CTS-97. Just cut the same size hole as a 4" round box, has it's own j-box attached to the driver, and attaches super-easy to the drywall. Choose 2700, 3000 or 4000K right on the unit.
If you connect an existing whip to this small j-box with driver, does the j-box need to be attached to a support like a joist, etc.? Certainly this would be desired but I think there are many situations where limited access could make mounting the j-box to something difficult.
 

480sparky

Senior Member
If you connect an existing whip to this small j-box with driver, does the j-box need to be attached to a support like a joist, etc.? Certainly this would be desired but I think there are many situations where limited access could make mounting the j-box to something difficult.
I just set the box up in the ceiling.
 

Knuckle Dragger

Master Electrician Electrical Contractor 01752
I prefer to install the rough-in plate and wire the j-box with the quick connect whip.during the rough when ever possible. It just makes it easier during the finish, less finger prints on the ceiling and plaster dust on the finished floors.
I may hold off on the rough-in plates around kitchen cabinets or other areas where the GC/ architect haven't nailed the finished points down yet.
 

eds

Senior Member
I have always been of the opinion of do as much on rough that you can, meaning locate boxes and strip and make up as much wiring as possible. I cant justify leaving wire in the ceiling and looking for it a trim time. Cut holes, dealing with insulation, just seems like it would be slower (new construction ). I have to do it for some of the small recess lights that we might use, but then i have to mark the floor for reference after drywall is up. leave slack for later, then it gets pinned between rock and joist when the insulators relocate it, or the drywallers do you a favor and pull it thru the drywall in the wrong location.
 
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