Red Brass Conduit

eds

Senior Member
I have a job that may require red brass conduit, mainly for looks. How does it age when exposed to the elements in the Midwest? Is it threaded like grc? Where can it be purchased from. Approx 40’?
 
How does it age? Depends on what's in the air around it, but should just turn a dull brassy gray unless it's been polished and sealed.
Where do you get it? Looks like pool suppliers are the main source.
Search the forum here for "red brass" and you'll get some useful hits.
You may find that stuffing regular EMT inside a thin brass tube is cheaper/easier than using the brass as the raceway.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
What's the application? 344.10 seems to have some limitations.

344.10(A)(2) Red Brass RMC. Red brass RMC shall be permitted to be installed for direct burial and swimming pool applications.
 

eds

Senior Member
Using it for exposed work on a outdoor gazebo, trying to mimic how copper ages when left exposed to the elements
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Using it for exposed work on a outdoor gazebo, trying to mimic how copper ages when left exposed to the elements
As mentioned, maybe sleeve some other method inside thin wall copper tubing probably the lesser expense option, then there is no mimicking involved you have real aged copper
 

winnie

Senior Member
Location
Springfield, MA, USA
Occupation
Electric motor research
As mentioned, maybe sleeve some other method inside thin wall copper tubing probably the lesser expense option, then there is no mimicking involved you have real aged copper

I would _not_ sleeve steel conduit in copper outdoors. The steel would corrode, valiantly protecting the copper from as a sacrificial anode.

-Jon
 

don_resqcapt19

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Illinois
Occupation
retired electrician
What's the application? 344.10 seems to have some limitations.
They fixed that in the 2020 code. There was never an intent to prohibit red brass from other applications, but that code language prior to the 2020 code did exactly that.
344.10 (A) Atmospheric Conditions and Occupancies.
(1) Galvanized Steel, Stainless Steel, and Red Brass RMC.
Galvanized steel, stainless steel, and red brass RMC shall be permitted under all atmospheric conditions and occupancies.
 

winnie

Senior Member
Location
Springfield, MA, USA
Occupation
Electric motor research
I would think UF could be pulled through copper tubing.

That is probably the simplest way to get copper 'conduit'.

Use UF cable, which doesn't require conduit, and is kosher in wet locations, and then use copper pipe as a sleeve for mechanical protection, that way you don't need something electrically rated.

I believe that tray cable could also be used in this fashion.

-Jon
 

eds

Senior Member
What i have right now is a piece of 3/4 pvc capped at the bottom of a stained mahogany gazebo post, this was installed 5 years ago as the outdoor area was being developed (just because who knows what will be needed later). Now a outdoor screen is being installed with a removable projector.
Fiber is going to be used from the rack to the projector location, with power for the projector coming from a extension chord plugged into an outlet i have on another column. that has since changed with the thought of having both fiber and power at the projector location. I was considering using red brass with hopes of getting a patina look, similar to the copper roof. I may be better off sleeving the pvc conduit up the post, would 1 /14 copper pipe go over 3/4 pvc
 

Todd0x1

Senior Member
Location
CA
That seems very expensive and time consuming with an added value that is not commensurate with the investment required. Could you not just run EMT and paint it brown to match the mahogany? Also consider metal thieves....
 

eds

Senior Member
Look is more important then cost with this client (within reason)

I think thwn and fiber may be easier to pull them uf and fiber. 3/4 conduit underground 50’, plus I would need to calculate fill as it will be piped up to the roof structure
 

winnie

Senior Member
Location
Springfield, MA, USA
Occupation
Electric motor research
Nominal 3/4" pvc conduit has an OD of 1.050 inches.

Nominal 1" copper 'type M' tubing has an OD of 1.125" and a wall of 0.035", meaning an ID of 1.055 inches.

By the nominal dimensions it 'should' fit, but with no room for tolerances and no room for things like fittings.

I wonder if you could get hard temper copper sheet formed into a coil that would wrap around the conduit with a seam that you could hide against the wall.

Cover it all in matching wood??

-Jon
 

petersonra

Senior Member
Location
Northern illinois
Occupation
engineer
Nominal 3/4" pvc conduit has an OD of 1.050 inches.

Nominal 1" copper 'type M' tubing has an OD of 1.125" and a wall of 0.035", meaning an ID of 1.055 inches.

By the nominal dimensions it 'should' fit, but with no room for tolerances and no room for things like fittings.

I wonder if you could get hard temper copper sheet formed into a coil that would wrap around the conduit with a seam that you could hide against the wall.

Cover it all in matching wood??

-Jon
If you are going to make a copper covering why not just cover some UF?

I am not overjoyed with having long runs of steel touching copper, even if the steel is zinc plated.

You should be able to get a metal fabricator to take sheet copper and turn it into any shape you might want.
 
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