repairing corrision on breakers, busses, conductors etc.

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Riograndeelectric

Senior Member
I am looking for standards & code in repairs to rust & corrosion on electrical equipment conductors, busses breakers etc.

I am not able to find anything in 2008 UL white book pertaining to corrosion or repairs to corroded electrical equipments.

Thanks.
Cameron
 

chris kennedy

Senior Member
Location
Miami Fla.
Occupation
60 yr old tool twisting electrician
I really don't think there is much you can do to repair, (110.12(B)) I would think you need to replace.
 

Riograndeelectric

Senior Member
I agree replacing it should be done and I am not saying I would try to clean the cororision.
I was looking for more specifics on if there are industry standards from UL NEMA,NFPA publication,ETCs that provide a more definitive answer than what 110.12(B) has to say
 

Little Bill

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Tennessee NEC:2017
Occupation
Electrician
I agree replacing it should be done and I am not saying I would try to clean the cororision.
I was looking for more specifics on if there are industry standards from UL NEMA,NFPA publication,ETCs that provide a more definitive answer than what 110.12(B) has to say

Does this have to do with your other post about corrosion in a panel that the GC doesn't want to replace?
 

Riograndeelectric

Senior Member
It does.
I want to better educate my self on the codes, standards for dealing with corrosion. like looking in the NEC for a code for location of outlets & how many are required,
it is like when you go to do repairs for a customer and you tell the customer they will need some up grades. you then have the NEC behind you
some times answers to question are not in the NEC but come from NEMA, UL,ETC

are there some publication on corrosion on electrical?


Cameron
 

zog

Senior Member
Location
Charlotte, NC
I am looking for standards & code in repairs to rust & corrosion on electrical equipment conductors, busses breakers etc.

I am not able to find anything in 2008 UL white book pertaining to corrosion or repairs to corroded electrical equipments.

Thanks.
Cameron

What kind of breakers? Small MCCB's or large switchgear? Give us an idea of what you are talking about.
 

satcom

Senior Member
They are not worth trying to fix anyway. I vote to replace them.

Yup, when you come across electrical equipment with signs of corrosion it usually indicates the equipment was exposed to conditions that promoted corrosion, so check the conditions in the area where the equipment is installed and correct any conditions that may be causing the problem and then replace the damaged equipment, once the decay starts it is usually all down hill from that point.
 

chicar

Senior Member
Location
Lancaster,Pa
When you are put in a position where you "touch" electrical equipment it is your expertise that is depended on too make that equipment perform to the best of its ability. Most times to insure this, it's best to replace with new. This choice allways make me sleep better at night. Ther will be situations that you won't find the answer in the code book. You as an electrician need to make that choice. Make the right and safest call.....Peace
 

Riograndeelectric

Senior Member
Yup, when you come across electrical equipment with signs of corrosion it usually indicates the equipment was exposed to conditions that promoted corrosion, so check the conditions in the area where the equipment is installed and correct any conditions that may be causing the problem and then replace the damaged equipment, once the decay starts it is usually all down hill from that point.


surelly there must be some type of printed standards on the repairs or replacement of electrical equipment with corrosion and damges to electrical equipment
 

satcom

Senior Member
surelly there must be some type of printed standards on the repairs or replacement of electrical equipment with corrosion and damges to electrical equipment

If you had good instructors thru your 5 years of apprentice class room work and also good master electricians to mentor you thru your 5000 on the job hours, then the issue of the effects of corrosion on electrical equipment would have been covered numerous of times and for sure it is part of every electricians training, the electrical trade is more then codes and standards, it takes years of study, hard work, and continuing education, to master the trade, and on your journey you will find many things that are learned thru experience over time.
 

Riograndeelectric

Senior Member
If you had good instructors thru your 5 years of apprentice class room work and also good master electricians to mentor you thru your 5000 on the job hours, then the issue of the effects of corrosion on electrical equipment would have been covered numerous of times and for sure it is part of every electricians training, the electrical trade is more then codes and standards, it takes years of study, hard work, and continuing education, to master the trade, and on your journey you will find many things that are learned thru experience over time.

I do not appreciate your negative attitude to my response you make sound like I am complete idiot are questioning my experience.
Not every one has been Lucky enough to go thru apprenticeship school.

this forum is supposed to me here to help other not to make negative comments or insinuating that I must not have had good training

what a hypocrite
your comment was totally out of line
 

satcom

Senior Member
I do not appreciate your negative attitude to my response you make sound like I am complete idiot are questioning my experience.
Not every one has been Lucky enough to go thru apprenticeship school.

this forum is supposed to me here to help other not to make negative comments or insinuating that I must not have had good training

what a hypocrite
your comment was totally out of line

It is not a negative remark, it is a general statement about how the trades gather a treasure of information on practical methods and Apply their work and school experience, there is plenty of information in text about corrosion and it's effects on equipment, the amercian electrician handbook and many manufactures have volumes on the subject, my post was not the literal you, it was in general area of experience shows not all knowledge in trade is in a code or standard, I am sorry you took the statements as a personal attack.
 

tommyrice

Member
replacing flooded breakers

replacing flooded breakers

NEMA has a standard for this.Look at hazardous locations in mike holts forum,and type in water flooded equipment and push search button.someone posted a link that you can open.you must register with the nema site to read their liturature.the standard says you can't clean or rebuild small breakers.if you download a copy of the standard(8 or 7 pages)you might be able to argue your case to an insurance adjuster for rewiring an entire home that was flooded
 
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