Residential garage door openers

olc

Senior Member
Quick questions:

Do you usually install receptacles on the ceiling for residential garage door openers?

If so it should be GFIC (I don't see an exception)?
 

480sparky

Senior Member
Location
Iowegia
SOP for me. But the issue now is where in the ceiling? There are openers where the motor sits right above the door opening.

Yes, they need to be GFCI protected. But installing a GFCI recep in the ceiling is not allowed, as it would require using a ladder to reset it in most installations. So by default, you'd want to line/load protect a standard recep from a GFCI recep or breaker elsewhere.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
SOP for me. But the issue now is where in the ceiling? There are openers where the motor sits right above the door opening.

Yes, they need to be GFCI protected. But installing a GFCI recep in the ceiling is not allowed, as it would require using a ladder to reset it in most installations. So by default, you'd want to line/load protect a standard recep from a GFCI recep or breaker elsewhere.
Are you seeing those with the power unit right above the door in residential applications? I don't think I ever have, but not impossible either I guess.

Otherwise yes, GFCI protection required (since 2008 I believe, maybe 2005, then the GFCI device was required to be readily accessible in the next code cycle)
 

480sparky

Senior Member
Location
Iowegia

SAP

Senior Member
Location
Fresno Ca
We go 10 are 11 feet from front of the garage on ceiling that is about were they mount there motor,center of garage door are nearest rafter put a single gang box and we come off garage CKT GFI
 

tom baker

First Chief Moderator
Staff member
My garage has a fairly low ceiling, I am tall and can reach 8 ft. I can easily reach the GFCI test and reset buttons. The issue is taking the definition for readily accessible, meant for a panel and applying to a GFCI under a sink...
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
My garage has a fairly low ceiling, I am tall and can reach 8 ft. I can easily reach the GFCI test and reset buttons. The issue is taking the definition for readily accessible, meant for a panel and applying to a GFCI under a sink...
Though I don't entirely agree with the readily accessible requirement for all GFCI's, I also don't think readily accessible was necessarily ever intended to apply to just panels.
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Four things

1) use either a gfci in the panel or use a dead front gfci in the garage (my preference).
2) I agree with 10-11 feet back but put the receptacle 12" off center of the door as it may get in the way.
3) If the ceiling is very high I usually leave 3 or 4' of wire out of the ceiling and bring the wire down the support for the door and mount the receptacle there as the cord on the door may not reach if it is a tall ceiling.
4) I lied about there being 4 things
 

ritelec

Senior Member
Location
Jersey
Quick questions:

Do you usually install receptacles on the ceiling for residential garage door openers?

If so it should be GFIC (I don't see an exception)?
Last code cycle and believe it or not jersey is still using 2005 exception for 2014
Also for behind equipment. NOT REQUIRED

Also afci not required when extending circs.

Check consumer affairs (addendums) for your state.

FWIW. I still install a accessible gfci dead front for that recept although it's not required.
 

mwm1752

Senior Member
Location
Aspen, Colo
My garage has a fairly low ceiling, I am tall and can reach 8 ft. I can easily reach the GFCI test and reset buttons. The issue is taking the definition for readily accessible, meant for a panel and applying to a GFCI under a sink...

You are taller than me 6'1" & my flat foot reach is 7'6" -- so do I make the non accessible call on your ceiling?:cool:
 

tbakelis

Senior Member
Even if side mount opener you should still put receptacle in center of garage. They typically install a wireless light in center that needs 110.
 

FionaZuppa

Senior Member
Location
AZ
Are you seeing those with the power unit right above the door in residential applications? I don't think I ever have, but not impossible either I guess.
iDrive and the like have been used for over 10yrs now in residential
this one sits about mid-way right on the torsion bar directly on the garage door header, etc.



I think the remote is wireless
they have wireless controlled lights, the iDrive unit will signal remote light on/off as needed, thus you just need 120v power for the light, do not need on/off control wires.
 
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kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
iDrive and the like have been used for over 10yrs now
this one sits about mid-way right on the torsion bar directly on the garage door header, etc.




they have wireless controlled lights, the iDrive unit will signla remote light on/off as needed, thus you just need 120v power for the light, do not need on/off control wires.
Is the remote light an actual luminaire they provide or a controller for your own luminaire?

Haven't been doing much dwelling work in recent years, but have never seen a residential opener that mounts on header of the door opening.

Looks like it has it's advantages though.

Guessing they are more of an accessory sold and installed with the door more so then a "one fits all" add on like the drawbar style openers are.
 

Barbqranch

Senior Member
Location
Arcata, CA
I haven't seen one of the Wayne Dalton idrive type openers yet, but I was wondering how do they handle power failures? The traditional carriage type just have a rope to disconnect them from the door.
 

olc

Senior Member
Thanks for the replies.
I'll check the accessibility of GFI issue.
The official NEC in NY is 2008. (I'll go by the latest though.)
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I haven't seen one of the Wayne Dalton idrive type openers yet, but I was wondering how do they handle power failures? The traditional carriage type just have a rope to disconnect them from the door.
Commercial door openers mounted over the door header also have release mechanism, usually a chain or cable you must pull to release the drive clutch from the torsion bar.
 
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