Residential Services Change for 2020-- Surge Protection

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
The 2020 NEC now requires surge Protection for all dwelling units services

230.67 Surge Protection.
230.67(A) Surge-Protective Device.

All services supplying dwelling units shall be provided with a surge-protective device (SPD).

230.67(B) Location.

The SPD shall be an integral part of the service equipment or shall be located immediately adjacent thereto.

Exception: The SPD shall not be required to be located in the service equipment as required in (B) if located at each next level distribution equipment downstream toward the load.

230.67(C) Type.

The SPD shall be a Type 1 or Type 2 SPD.

230.67(D) Replacement.

Where service equipment is replaced, all of the requirements of this section shall apply.
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Are these being pushed by the same circus peddling AFCI's? I'm open to being convinced, but this has nothing to do with electrical safety. Not being able to watch "Game of Thrones" re-runs doesn't count in my book.
 

PaulMmn

Senior Member
Location
Union, KY, USA
I can see a SPD, especially with almost everything having a computer inside it. Even electric irons have circuits to power them down if they stand idle too long! Toasters?

That said, I'd think it ought to be a -recommendation,- not a requirement.

For myself, I have four Zero-Surge units for my TVs, stereo, and computer equipment. Designed to keep the major electronics happy!
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Unfortunately it is not what we think or what we want...Even if you change the service the surge protection must be installed. Maybe NC will amend this
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
90.1Purpose.

(A) Practical Safeguarding.


The purpose of this Code is the practical safeguarding of persons and property from hazards arising from the use of electricity. This Code is not intended as a design specification or an instruction manual for untrained persons.

Can't follow their own rules. This is a design issue.
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
Location
-
Occupation
Engineer/Technician
These posts are really interesting and informative. Seriously...

Just wish it would count for my CEU hours. Sometimes I can get more information here that the classes.
 

tom baker

First Chief Moderator
Staff member
The surge protecgg th IR is useless except for the panel. As the cable length from the surge arrester goes up, so does the voltage. It will protect the breakers but not the TV. This scam has been sold for years and now it’s not even optional,

http://arresterworks.com/ArresterFac...LeadLength.pdf


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
UL standards for hard wired SPDs (with leads) are the leads can not be longer than 18". and the ones I have installed the leads are zip tied together every 1". good practice is to install the SPD directly opposite the branch breaker. this is to minimize the inductive loss. Doubling the lead length doubles the loss

One model of Levition (52,000 series) has no leads, the branch circuit is landed on a terminal at the top both line and load so there is basically no lead length.

My experience with SPDs is they are worth the cost. The damage from surges is cumulative, IE eventually those small surges can cause damage to electronics. GFCIs are a proven safety device with electronics, same as the more controversial AFCIs , SPDs will protect these, and all the other electronic equipment. By the way there are already two articles in the NEC that require SPDs
And lastly a quote from Mike Holt
"you get what you pay for. more is better"
 
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PaulMmn

Senior Member
Location
Union, KY, USA
I hope the whole-house SPDs are NOT using MOVs! MOVs are 'sacrificial--' every time they block a surge, they sacrifice some of their life. Many 'protected' power strips out in the world are just extension cords with lots of plugs-- even if the 'working' light it lit!
 

tom baker

First Chief Moderator
Staff member
To Quote - you get what you pay for. The SPDs I use have MOVs, gas tubes and seems like one other protective device. Thats true on MOVs, they loose some protection due to hits. A whole house SPD would be a type 2 and perhaps there is someone who knows what the UL requirements for a type 2.
IMO the best SPD is one that goes behind the meter socket. Zero lead length.
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
They vary in price from $60-$110 and higher. Home Depot had a better price than my suppliers who wanted $150 for the unit I bought for ~ $110.
 
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