Rules for apprentices

I'm an electrical instructor at the high school level and would like input regarding advice for new apprentices. I've seen some great info from plumbers regarding apprentices. Top 10 list of expectations, arrive on time, keep track of what has been taken from the van so that it can be replaced, etc. Getting input from someone besides the teacher is sometimes better received.
 

480sparky

Senior Member
Location
Iowegia
Show up on time.
Keep accurate records of the times and places you worked.
Keep accurate inventory records if this is your job.
Stock the truck after using something.
Maintain company tools.
Constantly improve your knowledge and mechanical skill.
Clean up your work area.
Minimize mistakes.
Use scrap material where possible.
No side jobs except for your mom.
Study if enrolled in apprenticeship.
Keep up with the latest NEC and local code amendments.
Don't borrow tools or anything from other workers without permission.
If you borrow something and break/lose it, buy them a new one.
Inform the shop of changes in your contact information.
Learn how to read and understand blueprints, job specs, etc.
Don't bring pets, children, or friends to the job.
Don't leave early without permission.
Don't miss days without a good reason.
Ask for time off well in advance.
Schedule vacation in writing. Keep a copy.
Advise job supervisor when you can not work overtime.
No working on live circuits if you're not qualified.
You get a paycheck for working, not just showing up.
Don't expect much in the way of gratitude from anyone.
Be pleasant to customers regardless. Or leave.
Don't quote a price to anyone for anything.
Plan your work. Work your plan.
Evaluate your work each day on the way home.
Help load and unload the trucks bringing material.
Don't use the couple top steps of a ladder.
Do not climb up the ‘back side’ of a ladder.
No smoking. Period.
Do every job the best way you know how.
Observe the work of other trades.
Look over electrical work wherever you can.
If you’re not sure, ask.
Read trade publications and manufacturers literature.
Attend trade shows.
Check material against invoice before signing for it.
No swearing, vulgar language or off-color/racist remarks.
Thank your boss for your job now and then.
If you ever get a bonus, say thanks.
Drive safely with seat belt in place.
Store material in the truck so the load will not injure you.
Tie down all ladders and other objects on the roof of vehicles.
Cover material to protect it from the elements.
Wear appropriate clothing for the elements.
Have a spare set of work clothes just in case.
Keep your first aid kit stocked and readily available.
Tools are not disposable. They are intended to be used more than once.
Know the location of the nearest emergency clinic and how to get there.
Update your first aid and CPR skills.
Notify the supervisor when damage is caused.
If you’re the last one out the door at the end, lock it.
Observe daily weather reports to anticipate hazardous changes.
Drink fluids to avoid heat stroke. Wear a hat in the sun.
Use tools only for the use they were intended.
Do not over-extend break and lunch periods.
Have several pair of dry gloves ready in winter.
If you find a lost tool, try your best to locate the proper owner.
Keep your job car in good working order.
Keep your hand tools in good working order.
No vulgar or offensive clothing (t-shirts, hats, etc.)
Be truthful when responding to supervisors.
Try to get a variety of work experience.
Volunteer for a difficult job now and then.
Go along to get along.
Put everything back where you got it.
The floor is not your personal garbage can.
Neither is the top of drop-ceiling tiles.
Care for your injuries. Stay healthy.
Own up and admit to your mistakes.
Don't take chances on ladders or scaffolding.
Don't take chances with live power.
Build up a backup set of hand tools for the day when yours are taken or lost.
Keep all company material and tools secure.
Do not use unsafe equipment. Report it immediately.
Replace hacksaw blade as often as needed.
Replace utility knife blade as often as needed.
Don’t be afraid to report theft /abuse / illegal activity.
Don't wear jewelry.
Don't antagonize or fight with other workers. Walk away.
Help other workers as needed.
Keep the radio volume at a reasonable level, if a radio is allowed.
Alcohol and drugs are absolutely forbidden.
Wear safety glasses and ear protection as appropriate.
Check your shoes/boots before entering the finished area of a building.
Be cautious working on new buildings during lightning storms.
When lifting, observe proper back position.
If something is too heavy for you ask for help.
Wear proper footgear to protect ankles from uneven ground.
Wear hard sole shoes where sharp objects like nails are present.
Wear a hard hat as required or where sensible.
Maintain GFCI in good working order.
Return phone calls promptly.
Use all safety equipment when required to.
Fill out paperwork everyday. Don’t wait until next week.
Listen closely to what you are told.
Always verify what you are told with the Codebook.
Turn your time card in well in advance of when it’s due.
This isn’t just a job……. It’s a career.
The more you put into your career, the more you will get out of it.
Your cell phone is no excuse for not working!
Put on a belt and pull up your pants to your waist!
 

Coppersmith

Senior Member
Location
Tampa, FL, USA
I tell every apprentice the same thing on their first day with me:

1) Always carry a pencil and paper because I may begin to rattle off a list to you at any time without warning except "take out your pencil and paper".

2) I don't know what you know so don't be offended when I tell you how to do something and don't say "I know". I'll decide when I think you know. Just do it.
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
Location
-
Occupation
Engineer/Technician
Show up on time.
Keep accurate records of the times and places you worked.
Keep accurate inventory records if this is your job.
Stock the truck after using something.
Maintain company tools.
Constantly improve your knowledge and mechanical skill.
Clean up your work area.
Minimize mistakes.
Use scrap material where possible.
No side jobs except for your mom.
Study if enrolled in apprenticeship.
Keep up with the latest NEC and local code amendments.
Don't borrow tools or anything from other workers without permission.
If you borrow something and break/lose it, buy them a new one.
Inform the shop of changes in your contact information.
Learn how to read and understand blueprints, job specs, etc.
Don't bring pets, children, or friends to the job.
Don't leave early without permission.
Don't miss days without a good reason.
Ask for time off well in advance.
Schedule vacation in writing. Keep a copy.
Advise job supervisor when you can not work overtime.
No working on live circuits if you're not qualified.
You get a paycheck for working, not just showing up.
Don't expect much in the way of gratitude from anyone.
Be pleasant to customers regardless. Or leave.
Don't quote a price to anyone for anything.
Plan your work. Work your plan.
Evaluate your work each day on the way home.
Help load and unload the trucks bringing material.
Don't use the couple top steps of a ladder.
Do not climb up the ‘back side’ of a ladder.
No smoking. Period.
Do every job the best way you know how.
Observe the work of other trades.
Look over electrical work wherever you can.
If you’re not sure, ask.
Read trade publications and manufacturers literature.
Attend trade shows.
Check material against invoice before signing for it.
No swearing, vulgar language or off-color/racist remarks.
Thank your boss for your job now and then.
If you ever get a bonus, say thanks.
Drive safely with seat belt in place.
Store material in the truck so the load will not injure you.
Tie down all ladders and other objects on the roof of vehicles.
Cover material to protect it from the elements.
Wear appropriate clothing for the elements.
Have a spare set of work clothes just in case.
Keep your first aid kit stocked and readily available.
Tools are not disposable. They are intended to be used more than once.
Know the location of the nearest emergency clinic and how to get there.
Update your first aid and CPR skills.
Notify the supervisor when damage is caused.
If you’re the last one out the door at the end, lock it.
Observe daily weather reports to anticipate hazardous changes.
Drink fluids to avoid heat stroke. Wear a hat in the sun.
Use tools only for the use they were intended.
Do not over-extend break and lunch periods.
Have several pair of dry gloves ready in winter.
If you find a lost tool, try your best to locate the proper owner.
Keep your job car in good working order.
Keep your hand tools in good working order.
No vulgar or offensive clothing (t-shirts, hats, etc.)
Be truthful when responding to supervisors.
Try to get a variety of work experience.
Volunteer for a difficult job now and then.
Go along to get along.
Put everything back where you got it.
The floor is not your personal garbage can.
Neither is the top of drop-ceiling tiles.
Care for your injuries. Stay healthy.
Own up and admit to your mistakes.
Don't take chances on ladders or scaffolding.
Don't take chances with live power.
Build up a backup set of hand tools for the day when yours are taken or lost.
Keep all company material and tools secure.
Do not use unsafe equipment. Report it immediately.
Replace hacksaw blade as often as needed.
Replace utility knife blade as often as needed.
Don’t be afraid to report theft /abuse / illegal activity.
Don't wear jewelry.
Don't antagonize or fight with other workers. Walk away.
Help other workers as needed.
Keep the radio volume at a reasonable level, if a radio is allowed.
Alcohol and drugs are absolutely forbidden.
Wear safety glasses and ear protection as appropriate.
Check your shoes/boots before entering the finished area of a building.
Be cautious working on new buildings during lightning storms.
When lifting, observe proper back position.
If something is too heavy for you ask for help.
Wear proper footgear to protect ankles from uneven ground.
Wear hard sole shoes where sharp objects like nails are present.
Wear a hard hat as required or where sensible.
Maintain GFCI in good working order.
Return phone calls promptly.
Use all safety equipment when required to.
Fill out paperwork everyday. Don’t wait until next week.
Listen closely to what you are told.
Always verify what you are told with the Codebook.
Turn your time card in well in advance of when it’s due.
This isn’t just a job……. It’s a career.
The more you put into your career, the more you will get out of it.
Your cell phone is no excuse for not working!
Put on a belt and pull up your pants to your waist!
Dang! That’s a heck of a list...
How long have you been compiling this list?
Its not to much to ask though from any employee, not just apprentices.
I actually read through the list and I agree with every point, even as an employee.
 

480sparky

Senior Member
Location
Iowegia
Dang! That’s a heck of a list...
How long have you been compiling this list?
Its not to much to ask though from any employee, not just apprentices.
I actually read through the list and I agree with every point, even as an employee.
I've had that list for about 7 or 8 years now.
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
Location
-
Occupation
Engineer/Technician
I've had that list for about 7 or 8 years now.
That bottom one is a requirement for us. Also shirt tails will be tucked in. Including tshirts in summer. Our customers don’t need to see belly below the shirt or crack from the back...
 
Talk as though the customer is always listening. That means do not swear, do not talk about your one night stand, act professional, and turn the music down before you arrive at the customers block. They should not hear you coming.

I don’t care how many times you need to ask as long as you ask. There are no dumb questions. If I don’t explain it in a way that makes sense to you then ask me again. If I tell you I don’t have time to explain it at that moment then ask me again later. If you think you understand but go to use the knowledge in the field and realize you don’t actually understand then call and ask. Know that it’s the journeyman’s job to teach the apprentice so take advantage of it while it’s expected for you to not know the information and it’s expected for you to learn, soon enough you will need to explain this same stuff to your apprentice so don’t be shy.

Be safe. Don’t risk your life to fix a unit. Don’t risk your health to make a buck. Don’t stick your hands where you wouldn’t stick your dick. If your off work due to an injury then you are not working. If you are not working then nobody is making money. You only get one shot at your health but you can have as many shots as you need to fix that unit. Know your priorities, safety comes first.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

sameguy

Senior Member
Location
New York
Occupation
Master Elec./JW retired
When you are standing next to me and I am in conversation with anyone DO NOT interject anything into the conversation!
 

Coppersmith

Senior Member
Location
Tampa, FL, USA
When you are standing next to me and I am in conversation with anyone DO NOT interject anything into the conversation!
I started my union apprenticeship at 46. At one of my first jobs a large crew was milling around a staging area before the 7am start waiting for the foreman to say "go to work!". I was gabbing with a journeyman when one of my apprenticeship classmates came over and said something to us. The j-man immediately started yelling at the apprentice, "You never interrupt two journeymen when they are talking!" "He's an apprentice" was the reply. "Oh." said the embarrassed j-man.
 

sameguy

Senior Member
Location
New York
Occupation
Master Elec./JW retired
Haha, I was thinking about the time I was talking to the GC and the Clerk of the works on a terrible job, setting them up for a big extra, that's how bad it had gotten, when a 3rd year (older say about 45) walked up to ask me a question. At least he was silent until I set the trap when he blurted out what he thought things were; fortunately we had just walked down the job so they blew him off, he was correct however. I later pulled him aside and gave him a Forman/ Supervisor instruction crash course; tell them, put it in writing, screw em. We had about $500,000 in extras by the time the court adjourned.
 

junkhound

Senior Member
Location
Renton, WA
No side jobs except for your mom.

Or do you mean no side paying jobs in total with which I agree? Unless you charge your mom!
Hmm - how about other volunteer like Habitat, your church, or similar??
That said, biggest gripe about Habitat is the radio volume subjected to at some sites by other workers.
 

junkhound

Senior Member
Location
Renton, WA
Habitat rule for volunteers: Noticed this on site - do not spend 1/2 your time hitting on the hot young volunteer.
Exception, 25% of time OK if you are both single volunteers and similar age, increasing to 99% if she (or he) is receptive. :D
Met my wife of 54 years volunteering at a summer camp :love:
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
If you read this forum for a while you'll find that there are many electrical myths in the this industry. Listen to what your told and learn on the job but always be somewhat skeptical and don't accept everything with blind faith. I've learned more wrong things in the field from other electricians over the years than right things. If something doesn't seem right ask for a code reference, go home look it up, do a Google search, ask a question here on the forum try and learn things correctly the first time.

I don't have enough fingers and toes to count how many times an electrician told me that you need a pull point every 100' in a conduit run. 🙄
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
Location
-
Occupation
Engineer/Technician
I’ve argued with one (he probably still believes) when he told me you are supposed to increase one wire size for every 100’ to account for voltage drop.
And he wonders why he gets beat on so many bid jobs...
 

Abu65

Member
Location
Kentucky
Be very neat and tidy take pride in your work and it's appearance. Quality is number 1. Sadly it's hard to teach this, if they don't care they just don't care.
 
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