Shock Hazard in Marina

I went to a marina that has the standard power pedestals - A 30 and a 50 amp receptacle with feed thru circuit breakers controlling. Grounds were good, and showed no voltage from ground to water (salt water). The pedestals are a heavy duty plastic, held together with stainless screws. Each screw is only in contact with plastic. On the screws nearest the breakers: between screw and ground or screw and water I got anywhere from 20 to 100 volts AC. I grounded all the screws to the good grounds. Is this "induced" voltage, like a transformer? Anybody run into this before?
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I went to a marina that has the standard power pedestals - A 30 and a 50 amp receptacle with feed thru circuit breakers controlling. Grounds were good, and showed no voltage from ground to water (salt water). The pedestals are a heavy duty plastic, held together with stainless screws. Each screw is only in contact with plastic. On the screws nearest the breakers: between screw and ground or screw and water I got anywhere from 20 to 100 volts AC. I grounded all the screws to the good grounds. Is this "induced" voltage, like a transformer? Anybody run into this before?
Measure with a low impedance meter, if it is anything "induced" there will not be substantial power behind the source of this voltage and the low impedance will allow enough current flow to 'short out' the source. If you still have voltage with a low impedance meter - you have a problem serious enough to be a hazard.
 
Top