small appliance branch ckt.

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rjdad82

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as the code reads in 210.52b3 receptacles installed in a kitchen to serve countertop surfaces shall be supplied by no fewer than two small appliance branch ckts. As it states we need two circuits, refridgeration equipment is also allowed to be covered by this section. My question, is the refridgeration outlet accepted as one of the two circuits or is it in addition to. I have a seperate circuit for the disposal, dishwasher and microwave/hood combo. I am using a seperate circuit for the refridgerator also and the kitchen only has 4 receptacles total.
 

charlie b

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Ignoring all other things in the kitchen, you need two circuits that serve the countertops. Perhaps the fridge could share one of those, but it would not change the requirement for two circuits at the countertops. I would put two receptacles on each of two separate circuits.
 

Dennis Alwon

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I agree with Charlie. You could do one of a few things here.
1) You can leave the ref. as a separate circuit and then have 2 kit. circuits for the 4 countertop receptacles.
2) You could hook one of the 4 recep. to the refrigerator cir.-- assuming it is a 20 amp cir.
3) Or you could do a variation of the above.

In any case the 2 SABC must land on the counter recep. for a least part of the run.
 

Dennis Alwon

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The frig. may or may not have to be GFCI protected.

210.8(A)(6) exempts it from GFCI protection.

But 210.8(A)(7) requires it within 6' of a sink.

If you are talking the 2008 then I disagree-- no surprise...:)

210.8(A)(7) is for laundry, utility and wet bar sinks-- I don't believe a sink in the kitchen would qualify as a wet bar sink.
 

jxofaltrds

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Mike P. Columbus Ohio
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If you are talking the 2008 then I disagree-- no surprise...:)

210.8(A)(7) is for laundry, utility and wet bar sinks-- I don't believe a sink in the kitchen would qualify as a wet bar sink.

Wait a minute (7) does not mention kitchen sinks.

(7) Laundry, utility, and wet bar sinks ? where the receptacles
are installed within 1.8 m (6 ft) of the outside
edge of the sink

Dennis types faster than me.

If you both are correct, and I read it the same way, non-counter top receptacles are never required to be GFCI protected within 6' of a kitchen sink (dwelling units).

Example: Imagine a shelf behind a kitchen sink. I could put a recp. on the shelf and not have to GFCI protected it.
 

Dennis Alwon

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If you both are correct, and I read it the same way, non-counter top receptacles are never required to be GFCI protected within 6' of a kitchen sink (dwelling units).

Example: Imagine a shelf behind a kitchen sink. I could put a recp. on the shelf and not have to GFCI protected it.

I will agree with that. It may not pass but if it is not a counter recep. then no it doesn't need GFCI. If you install a switched recep for low voltage lights in a cabinet within 5' of the sink, then would install GFCI protection? I say not necessary according to NEC.
 

Dennis Alwon

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In 2011 210(8)(7) will say "located in areas other than kitchen."

That may clarify it some however 210.8(A)(6) is pretty definitive. You cannot make more out of it then need be. Recep. for disposal, trash compactors, etc do not need gfci-- the words are not there to support your claim.
 

jxofaltrds

Inspector Mike®
Location
Mike P. Columbus Ohio
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ESI, PI, RBO
I will agree with that. It may not pass but if it is not a counter recep. then no it doesn't need GFCI. If you install a switched recep for low voltage lights in a cabinet within 5' of the sink, then would install GFCI protection? I say not necessary according to NEC.

Why would it not pass?

I think switches are a little different. Kitchen sink is not in the code.

Would it be fair for an inspector to consider it a utility sink?
 

Dennis Alwon

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Location
Chapel Hill, NC
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Why would it not pass?

I think switches are a little different. Kitchen sink is not in the code.

Would it be fair for an inspector to consider it a utility sink?

I think it should pass but I could see a receptacle on on a shelf within 20 inches of the counter as being viewed as serving the counter.

What difference does it make if the recep. is switched or not. You can't just make up rules saying a switched recp. is okay but not an unswitched one.
 
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