smoke detector installation for remodels

Status
Not open for further replies.
Hi guys. I just failed an inspection on a small kitchen remodel because I did not have linked/hardwired smoke/CO detectors in and out of the bedrooms. So I wonder where the line is drawn as to when you need to install these detectors for the scope of work perfomed. The inspector (city of sarasota) requires detectors on every permitted job that previously had no SDs or battery operated ones (not networked). I understand the safety issues, but come on, small jobs can get very expensive. I know the NEC does not cover this, that's why I started this thread in the safety forum. Any thoughts?
 

stickboy1375

Senior Member
Location
Litchfield, CT
Hi guys. I just failed an inspection on a small kitchen remodel because I did not have linked/hardwired smoke/CO detectors in and out of the bedrooms. So I wonder where the line is drawn as to when you need to install these detectors for the scope of work perfomed. The inspector (city of sarasota) requires detectors on every permitted job that previously had no SDs or battery operated ones (not networked). I understand the safety issues, but come on, small jobs can get very expensive. I know the NEC does not cover this, that's why I started this thread in the safety forum. Any thoughts?
If the rooms are open, we install them, rooms untouched get battery smoke detectors, thats about it... you can't enforce hardship on someone. IMO. I would check into if what the inspector is requiring is just his own idea of safety or an actual state amendment.
 

hurk27

Senior Member
While here it would only be required if you have access, but in most single story simple houses its not hard to cut in boxes in the bedrooms and hall right out side and push a 14/3 NM over to the other openings, then just hit a light for power if wired that way, otherwise it gets battery powered smokes.

So I guess I use if the attic is accessible I plan on putting them in whether or not required because it does add safety to the house, but that is my own choice.

Florida used to be state wide codes but over the years I see they have allowed local codes so its going to depend upon these things:

1. What does your state allow to be adopted at local level.
2. What has been adopted at local level.

Here in Indiana we have state wide building codes but!!!! smoke/co detectors here are under fire rules and are allowed to be controlled at local level, thus we are in the same boat.
 

TobyD

Senior Member
In our area if the home is occupied then the rules are somewhat different.In many cases the inspector will suggest that the smoke dects. be added.But, in case of a burn out and misc. repair if the power is turned off to the dwelling then we have to add smokes and bring any area efffected up to code.
Then comes the 50% rule.If the job is being remodeled if it meets 50% of the total sq. ftg. then we have to bring it up to code standard.
 

jumper

Senior Member
Look at Section 314 of the IRC.
Okay.:)

R314.3.1 Alterations, repairs and additions. When alterations, repairs or additions requiring a permit occur, or when one or more sleeping rooms are added or created in existing dwellings, the individual dwelling unit shall be equipped with smoke alarms located as required for new dwellings.

Exceptions:

1. Work involving the exterior surfaces of dwellings, such as the replacement of roofing or siding, or the addition or replacement of windows or doors, or the addition of a porch or deck, are exempt from the requirements of this section.

2. Installation, alteration or repairs of plumbing or mechanical systems are exempt from the requirements of this section.
 

M_J_C

Member
Way over here on the east coast of the state, most jurisdictions we work in require you to upgrade the SD's in a renovation to current code IF you can do so without damaging the walls/ceilings of the home in the areas not being renovated. I ranted about this a while back, so I understand where you coming from.

It all depends on you local jurisdictions' requirements, and more importantly the AHJ you're dealing with.

Did they ask you about CO alarms?

The requirement for CO detection/alarm is a Florida state law, so you will not find it in the NEC or NFPA 72
 

jumper

Senior Member
Way over here on the east coast of the state, most jurisdictions we work in require you to upgrade the SD's in a renovation to current code IF you can do so without damaging the walls/ceilings of the home in the areas not being renovated. I ranted about this a while back, so I understand where you coming from.

It all depends on you local jurisdictions' requirements, and more importantly the AHJ you're dealing with.

Did they ask you about CO alarms?

The requirement for CO detection/alarm is a Florida state law, so you will not find it in the NEC or NFPA 72
But you will find it in the IRC.

R315.2 Where required in existing dwellings. Where work requiring a permit occurs in existing dwellings that have attached garages or in existing dwellings within which fuel-fired appliances exist, carbon monoxide alarms shall be provided in accordance with Section R315.1.
 

jxofaltrds

Senior Member
Location
Mike P. Columbus Ohio
Occupation
ESI
Ohio:
313.1.1 Alterations, repairs and additions.

When interior alterations, repairs or additions requiring a permit occur, or when one or more sleeping rooms are added or created in existing dwellings, the individual dwelling unit shall be provided with smoke alarms located as required for new dwellings; the smoke alarms shall be interconnected and hard wired.

Exceptions:

1. Smoke alarms in existing areas shall not be required to be interconnected and hard wired where the alterations or repairs do not result in the removal of interior wall or ceiling finishes exposing the structure, unless there is an attic, crawl space, or basement available which could provide access for hard wiring and interconnection without the removal of interior finishes.

2. Repairs to the exterior surfaces of dwellings are exempt from the requirements of this section.

3. For the purpose of this section a screened porch, deck or similar structure is not considered an interior alteration, repair or addition.

http://publicecodes.citation.com/st/oh/st/b4v06/st_oh_st_b4v06_3_sec013.htm?bu=OH-P-2011-000004
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top