Smurf Tube Question ......

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Davies

Member
Can anybody tell me if it is legal to connect ENT ( Smurf Tube ) to a residential electical panel at the standard knock out locations?
Thanks. - S.
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Not sure how PVC got into the thread but I agree with Don, there should be no reason that ent cannot connect to a panel with the proper fittings.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Can anybody tell me if it is legal to connect ENT ( Smurf Tube ) to a residential electical panel at the standard knock out locations?
Thanks. - S.
If you don't use existing KO's that leaves you with making your own holes, most of the panels used for residential do not have very much area that does not have pre-punched positions:confused:
 

John Valdes

Senior Member
Location
SC.
Does anyone here even use ENT ?? I sure don't and won't.
Jim, I watched a show where they were using it in a slab for a high rise building. It was in CA. I questioned it on the other forum and it seems it's perfectly suited for slabs. I even saw it floating up above the concrete (crappy tying) while they were pouring it. I hate the stuff and hate it even more in an application like I describe. But, I must admit I have never used the stuff.

I cannot remember the name of the show. It was on one of the documentary type channels like Discovery. It showed all the trades and their jobs if I am remembering correctly.
 

curt swartz

Electrical Contractor - San Jose, CA
Location
San Jose, CA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Would PVC fittings be legal to use with ENT?
Yes and I have done it many time for transitions from Sch 40 to ENT.

Here is a statement from Carlon's ENT FAQ.


UL lists 1/2" through 2" Schedule 40 fittings (couplings and adapters) for use with ENT. When using the Schedule 40 fittings, ENT cement along with the specific cementing instructions are to be utilized (see the Flex-Plus Blue ENT product catalog).
 

A/A Fuel GTX

Senior Member
Location
WI & AZ
Yes and I have done it many time for transitions from Sch 40 to ENT.

Here is a statement from Carlon's ENT FAQ.


UL lists 1/2" through 2" Schedule 40 fittings (couplings and adapters) for use with ENT. When using the Schedule 40 fittings, ENT cement along with the specific cementing instructions are to be utilized (see the Flex-Plus Blue ENT product catalog).
Awesome info....thanks!
 

mxslick

Senior Member
Location
SE Idaho
Jim, I watched a show where they were using it in a slab for a high rise building. It was in CA. I questioned it on the other forum and it seems it's perfectly suited for slabs. I even saw it floating up above the concrete (crappy tying) while they were pouring it. I hate the stuff and hate it even more in an application like I describe. But, I must admit I have never used the stuff.

I cannot remember the name of the show. It was on one of the documentary type channels like Discovery. It showed all the trades and their jobs if I am remembering correctly.
The show was "L.A. Hardhats", the electrical contractor was Morrow-Meadows (who I have worked with and they are outstanding) and the issue with the floating smurf was because other trades who followed behind cut the ties to get their stuff in. :roll:

I was highly amused about how they played up the danger of throwing the main for the first time. Now with a service of that size yes it would be very bad if anything went wrong, but with M-M I would be very confident that nothing was wrong.

With that said, I have used smurf tube and hate it with a passion. It is a pain to lay neatly, really hard to pull wire through and is too fragile IMHO. Perhaps embedded in a slab like on the show it would work better other than the pulling issue.

Bad joke of the week: If you strangle a Smurf, what color does it turn?
 

Davies

Member
Davies ......Smurf Tube to Panel Connect... Cont'd.

Davies ......Smurf Tube to Panel Connect... Cont'd.

Boy, I really appreciate evrybody's responses.
I am worried about getting a finicky inspector. I already called him, and asked him the same question. He seemed indecisive, and without clear knowledge ( my perception ) he suggested that I should use EMT conduit. I have used Smurf tube in the walls, and I have connected it to panel upgrades before, but that was in a situation where there was no inspector. So I have been reading, and reading, and reading in the code what conduit limitations are stipulated in the panel section ( 408? ), and I also looked at authorized and non-authorized uses under codes 362.10 and 362.12. There is nothing specifically about connecting to the elctrical panel with specifically approved types of conduit. So that leads me to trying to anticipate on what aspect of the code section the inspector would otherwise refer to if he has a bias away from Smurf tube - which I am sure you all are familiar with.

Thanks for your continued very informative responses. - Stephan

P.S. If you are wondering why? --- It is because this older house has only 4 fused circuits. A minor house remodel will be happening at a later date. Obviously I need to get the new home runs to the panel, but the wall will have to be resealed to pass final. So the obvious problem comes in on how to connect any number of corcuits the panel is capable of from either under the house or from the attic, or both, at later dates. So the solution is Smurf tube ( blue ) or some other form of conduit. Because Smurf tube is so incredibly flexible, and does not kink into tight bends, it is great in getting around utilities underneath, and pulling wire thru it is a breeze also.
 

Cow

Senior Member
Location
Eastern Oregon
Why don't guys run pvc in slabs instead of smurf tube? That's all we run, it would seem like it'd be a lot easier to pull through and not too much more trouble to install.
 

cschmid

Senior Member
I have used Smurf Tube (ent) and really do not like it. it was easy to run but hard to make neat and what a pain to pull wire through. I am not impressed and it is not my choice of materials to use..
 

busman

Senior Member
The only place I really use smurf tube is very short runs to a panel to connect Whole House surge protectors. I works great for a 3-12" run in an awkward location.

Mark
 

jeremysterling

Senior Member
Location
Austin, TX
I used smurf in a single family dwelling. The inspector had no problem with 1" smurf coming from the service panel going through the attic to a sub-panel.
 
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kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I used smurf in a single family dwelling. The inspector had no problem with 1" smurf coming from the service panel going through the attic to a sub-panel.
What temperature was it subject to in the attic? This is one place that is not a good application if it is subject to high temperatures.

One of the conditions in 362.12 Uses not permitted mentions - where temperature exceeds 122 degrees F.
 

suemarkp

Senior Member
Location
Kent, WA
Occupation
Engineer
I you're using smurf in a house, why not just run romex instead? They seem to have similar uses and restrictions. Neither can be exposed to physical damage.
 
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