The Psychology of concept attainment

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T.M.Haja Sahib

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The Psychology of concept attainment states that,instead of teaching a subject to students lesson by lesson in a gradual fashion,if the whole subject is taught in a summary form,the understanding of students improve a lot better.

Years ago,while working as an instructor for a very short time,I tried the above method and completed the six months semester teaching material in two weeks time by discussing the headlines in each topic.But unfortunately,I could not assess the effectiveness of the method,because I left the teaching post for more lucrative post elsewhere.

Do you guys think the method works?Thanks.
 

charlie b

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Any teaching method can work for a student whose mind is geared toward learning in that fashion. There are people who can learn in a class that uses that method. There are other people who simply cannot learn that way. Every individual person has a learning style that suits him or her better than any other learning style. To teach a single person successfully, you must first understand that person's learning style. To successfully teach a group of students, you must recognize the challenge that you are facing: the challenge of giving all the students an equal chance to learn. Put more simply, know your audience.
 

don_resqcapt19

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The Psychology of concept attainment states that,instead of teaching a subject to students lesson by lesson in a gradual fashion,if the whole subject is taught in a summary form,the understanding of students improve a lot better.

Years ago,while working as an instructor for a very short time,I tried the above method and completed the six months semester teaching material in two weeks time by discussing the headlines in each topic.But unfortunately,I could not assess the effectiveness of the method,because I left the teaching post for more lucrative post elsewhere.

Do you guys think the method works?Thanks.
They tried that with math at the local high school. It lasted a few years and was a complete failure. Many of the students had to take remedial (non-credit) math classes when they went on to college based because of the poor scores on thier math placement tests.
 

mivey

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Is it the Cliff Notes version only or do you do the overview first then go back later for the gory details?
 

don_resqcapt19

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Is it the Cliff Notes version only or do you do the overview first then go back later for the gory details?
With the program that they tried here, they gave general overviews of diffent math subjects and then tried to come back weeks or months later and build on that general overview.
 
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T.M.Haja Sahib

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A definite number of questions should be asked to the student at the end of a learning session to check his/her understanding of the subject taught.Teaching a summary of entire subject of,say, one semester over a very brief period at the beginning of the semester and asking each student the essential number of questions at the end of the subject summary session may be a good start.

What do you think?Thanks.
 

jumper

Senior Member
I am going to say that I am more in favor of sticking to traditional methods.

What you propose might work for advanced level courses, but sounds really hard for the average student.

Some of the hardest courses I took in college were the 4 hour, once a week night courses. It was a lot to try and take in all at once and many times after 2-3 hours my brain would simply overload and shut down. I cannot imagine trying to have a semesters worth of study given to me in 2 weeks. I think my head would explode.
 

ActionDave

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A definite number of questions should be asked to the student at the end of a learning session to check his/her understanding of the subject taught.Teaching a summary of entire subject of,say, one semester over a very brief period at the beginning of the semester and asking each student the essential number of questions at the end of the subject summary session may be a good start.

What do you think?Thanks.
I like the idea. Put the information out there, let me sift it and ask questions, then test me to see if I understand.

I use this approach with the motor guru at my shop. Every time I ask him what time it is, he tells me how to build a watch. But the end result is I learn a lot.
 

jumper

Senior Member
I like the idea. Put the information out there, let me sift it and ask questions, then test me to see if I understand.

I use this approach with the motor guru at my shop. Every time I ask him what time it is, he tells me how to build a watch. But the end result is I learn a lot.
Dave, google differential and integral calculus and tell me if you would really want that thrown at you all at once. It took me over 20 hours a week study with 4 days a week of classes to get it.
 

mivey

Senior Member
Dave, google differential and integral calculus and tell me if you would really want that thrown at you all at once.
In our next clip, we watch as a student gingerly approaches the fire hydrant for a sip of water...
 

Besoeker

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In our next clip, we watch as a student gingerly approaches the fire hydrant for a sip of water...
Very good analogy!:p

And you might want to turn to a bit of G&S for inspiration and enlightenment:

I'm very well acquainted, too, with matters mathematical,
I understand equations, both the simple and quadratical,
About binomial theorem I'm teeming with a lot o' news,
With many cheerful facts about the square of the hypotenuse.

I'm very good at integral and differential calculus;
I know the scientific names of beings animalculous:
In short, in matters vegetable, animal, and mineral,
I am the very model of a modern Major-General.

:cool:
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
The Psychology of concept attainment states that,instead of teaching a subject to students lesson by lesson in a gradual fashion,if the whole subject is taught in a summary form,the understanding of students improve a lot better.

Years ago,while working as an instructor for a very short time,I tried the above method and completed the six months semester teaching material in two weeks time by discussing the headlines in each topic.But unfortunately,I could not assess the effectiveness of the method,because I left the teaching post for more lucrative post elsewhere.

Do you guys think the method works?Thanks.
Higher learning institutions don't want that to be known. They don't want to be giving away 4 year degrees in only 1 year, that leaves too much money in the students pockets:happyyes:
 

jumper

Senior Member
Very good analogy!:p

And you might want to turn to a bit of G&S for inspiration and enlightenment:

I'm very well acquainted, too, with matters mathematical,
I understand equations, both the simple and quadratical,
About binomial theorem I'm teeming with a lot o' news,
With many cheerful facts about the square of the hypotenuse.

I'm very good at integral and differential calculus;
I know the scientific names of beings animalculous:
In short, in matters vegetable, animal, and mineral,
I am the very model of a modern Major-General.

:cool:

 

woodturner9

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Location
Pennsylvania
Higher learning institutions don't want that to be known. They don't want to be giving away 4 year degrees in only 1 year, that leaves too much money in the students pockets
Perhaps the unasked question is "what level of understanding do you want the student to have"?

I teach at a top ten engineering university. What seems to work best for me is to teach a high level overview first - what the topics will be, why they are important and relevant, and how they relate to each other. I usually spend the first week or so on this, then we spend the rest of the semester "filling in the details".

The overview gives the students a "framework" in which to place the topics in concept and get the "big picture". It helps avoid the "can't see the forest for the trees" syndrome.

The other "key" to effective learning is evaluation - the students have to be tested in some form on the material or it doesn't "stick".

Not sure if this approach is exactly what the OP meant, but it has worked well for me for many years.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Perhaps the unasked question is "what level of understanding do you want the student to have"?

I teach at a top ten engineering university. What seems to work best for me is to teach a high level overview first - what the topics will be, why they are important and relevant, and how they relate to each other. I usually spend the first week or so on this, then we spend the rest of the semester "filling in the details".

The overview gives the students a "framework" in which to place the topics in concept and get the "big picture". It helps avoid the "can't see the forest for the trees" syndrome.

The other "key" to effective learning is evaluation - the students have to be tested in some form on the material or it doesn't "stick".

Not sure if this approach is exactly what the OP meant, but it has worked well for me for many years.
I was only attempting to humor people with my reply.
 
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T.M.Haja Sahib

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The other "key" to effective learning is evaluation - the students have to be tested in some form on the material or it doesn't "stick".
If one teaching period is,say,one hour,teaching the subject may be only 40 minutes and remaining period should be devoted to asking each student the essential minimum number of questions about the subject being taught.
I do not believe this is followed by any instructor,because the instructor is usually in a hurry to finish the course syllabus.
 

ActionDave

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Perhaps the unasked question is "what level of understanding do you want the student to have"?
If one teaching period is,say,one hour,teaching the subject may be only 40 minutes and remaining period should be devoted to asking each student the essential minimum number of questions about the subject being taught.
I do not believe this is followed by any instructor,because the instructor is usually in a hurry to finish the course syllabus.
Fair enough when addressing the last point in his post, but you did not address his first.

Added: T.M. Please include one space after each punctuation mark, just like you would after the end of each word. It would make the reading of your posts much easier.
 
T

T.M.Haja Sahib

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.....but you did not address his first.
One pedagogical rule states that even any higher level educational material can be taught to students at much lower level. (May be the human brain acquires its full intellectual capacity at age 12 ? ) .
Added: T.M. Please include one space after each punctuation mark, just like you would after the end of each word. It would make the reading of your posts much easier.
Sorry.
 

ActionDave

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One pedagogical rule states that even any higher level educational material can be taught to students at much lower level. (May be the human brain acquires its full intellectual capacity at age 12 ? ) .
Yes it anything can be taught, and learned. I do this everyday.

But you still have not addressed this-
Perhaps the unasked question is "what level of understanding do you want the student to have"?
No need to apologize, just hit that space bar. It is easy, you can use either thumb.
 
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