Torque Screwdriver

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squaredan

Senior Member
Location
Pennsylvania
110.3B says we got to follow the listing and lable of equipment, I got that..How many of you really, Be honest, use a Torque Screwdriver for your connections?..The more I learn and study the code I want to do things right and have been looking at Torque Screwdrivers on Ebay and man are they exspensive..The guys at work laugh at me everytime I talk about getting one..Can anyone also give me any tips on getting one, what to get or not to get..

Dan
 

ptonsparky

Senior Member
Location
NE (9.06 miles @5.9 Degrees from Winged Horses)
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
I have one. We use it occasionally. No hints. Just remember to have it re-calibrated every now and then just to prove to everyone that you really do care. Besides that extra $60 every year keeps the economy going and you can just about bet when it comes down to a lawsuit at least one lawyer will ask when it was last calibrated.

If you are doing devices, 15 in lbs seems terribly loose and if doing snap in CBs you will think 35-50 in lbs way to tight.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I have one. We use it occasionally. No hints. Just remember to have it re-calibrated every now and then just to prove to everyone that you really do care. Besides that extra $60 every year keeps the economy going and you can just about bet when it comes down to a lawsuit at least one lawyer will ask when it was last calibrated.

If you are doing devices, 15 in lbs seems terribly loose and if doing snap in CBs you will think 35-50 in lbs way to tight.

I think everyone should use them if anything just to understand how little or too much torque they are applying to different items. 35-50 in lbs called for on many circuit breakers is going to give you a sore wrist after tightening a 42 circuit panel full of breakers. Turn a screw that tight on a receptacle and something may break.

Same opinion with larger lugs using a torque wrench.

Overtightening and breaking a lug on industrial breakers or motor starters will cost you more than your torque wrench or screwdriver costs.
 

hillbilly1

Senior Member
Location
North Georgia mountains
Occupation
Owner/electrical contractor
I bought one for a job a couple of months back. Customer required it. Only place I've used it. After doing electrical work for nearly 30 years, I have yet to have something I installed fail due to improper torque. That being said I have came in behind guys that overtorqued lugs to a point of non removal. it's just common sense on knowing when enough is enough, and too little is too little.
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Professional Engineer, Fire & Life Safety
I bought one for a job a couple of months back. Customer required it. Only place I've used it. After doing electrical work for nearly 30 years, I have yet to have something I installed fail due to improper torque. That being said I have came in behind guys that overtorqued lugs to a point of non removal. it's just common sense on knowing when enough is enough, and too little is too little.

I dunno, I think it might be a good idea to use one once in a while just to get the feel of the proper torque ranges. I once had a boss who could just about crush gravel with his bare hands. He was always stripping threads, and you never needed Loc-Tite when the connections were "Bob-Tite"! :lol:
 
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I guess devices that require torque screwdrivers are cheap so a quick learning curve for newbies is okay :D

For my self when I worked on aircraft I have used all manner of torque screw drivers and wrenches.

On larger (expensive) equipment I always use a torque wrench... always.

Have never used a TS on recept or CB
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I guess devices that require torque screwdrivers are cheap so a quick learning curve for newbies is okay :D

For my self when I worked on aircraft I have used all manner of torque screw drivers and wrenches.

On larger (expensive) equipment I always use a torque wrench... always.

Have never used a TS on recept or CB

Not even I-Line or equivelant breaker. Overtightening lugs on one of those could cost you 3 or 4 torque screwdrivers in replacement cost, and that is just for the 100 amp and less frame sizes.
 

squaredan

Senior Member
Location
Pennsylvania
I have one. We use it occasionally. No hints. Just remember to have it re-calibrated every now and then just to prove to everyone that you really do care. Besides that extra $60 every year keeps the economy going and you can just about bet when it comes down to a lawsuit at least one lawyer will ask when it was last calibrated.

If you are doing devices, 15 in lbs seems terribly loose and if doing snap in CBs you will think 35-50 in lbs way to tight.

I forgot that they do have to be recalibrated, where do to go to get that done? Thanks for the tips, and it is good to use them and get a feel what 15in lbs ect..
 
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