Trouble Shooting Fire door

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I use to think that most fire doors were 'fail' safe, meaning if the fire alarm/or door looses power then the door would still close.

I had been trouble shooting a fire door circuit and its a more modern one, with a 'circuit board for most of the controls. Im used to the old types with out the board.

originally the problem was the 'safety edge' strip wasnt working, its what makes the door go back up if it was comming down on an obstructions. Its adjustable (air switch, Ive done them before). Tried adjusting it, (to make it more sensitive) and now the motor clutch break engages, and you cant move it up or down with the controls, and it gives out a loud whistle, (I dont believe its an alarm).

I put the settings back to the original setting, and still no control. Turned off power(disco switch) to try to reset. still no go.
I believe the cirucit board is bad. Just looking for other options, cause this board is gonna be costly. I know the old ones without them are easy to fix and less expensive.

Any ideas???
 

e57

Senior Member
I use to think that most fire doors were 'fail' safe, meaning if the fire alarm/or door looses power then the door would still close.

Any ideas???
Not always - I have done a number of them with battery back-ups - so that the door does not close unless in an alarm condition - untill the battery dies...

Either way - there are so many controllers out there - we would really need a schematic to even contemplate it. Also there may be many different dip switch settings for programming that it may even be doing exactly what it is suppossed to - just not programmed for what you want it to do.

http://www.dasma.com/PDF/Publications/TechDataSheets/RollingDoor/TDS258.pdf
 

Cow

Senior Member
Location
Eastern Oregon
Do you have the book on it?

A call to the manufacturer might help confirm the bad board before you spend the money to replace it too.
 

cschmid

Senior Member
The fire code for the area and building use will determine whether the door is open, closed or stops dead in its tracks. Then the alarm controller will give a signal to that particular procedure on the door..now you have to trouble shoot the alarm input and that is all it is..the rest of the trouble shooting comes on the door controller..

So lets say the opener is given an instruction to open the door..then if you remove the input the door opener is now isolated from the alarm control..So first isolated the door from the alarm then determine if the door opener is working properly if not then fix..to do that you will need to have the door operator manual..

the fire alarm controller can do more then just give a input to the door it can also monitor the postion..yet this would take more control then the normal fire alarm controller is equipped with..

Good Luck ..
 
Well just to give an update. I finally got the door to work right. it was a 'programmed chip' in the board. The manufacturer had sent me the wrong one before, (was a headache getting the right one) but 'finally it was done after long convo's with the manufacturers

The other part is that there was no 'manual' on this thing, to let a person know how long the 'alarm' is suppose to sound (12 secs after reseting). I know these the new doors got the 'computer chips' but sometimes I feel that is better to just keep the old style doors that dont have them, they seem to be more dependable (less break down) and easier to repair.
 
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