whats COOL

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copper chopper

Senior Member
Location
wisconsin
I am wondering what you guys use or ideas for keeping cool in the heat.. in the winter we can dress for warmth but in the summer when its 95+ degrees here is the normal attire i have to wear. long pants, t- shirt with 4 inch sleeves, hard hat, saftey glasses, and cut resistant gloves.drinking water all day only goes so far. What do you guys suggest?
 

hillbilly1

Senior Member
Location
Atlanta,Ga
I am wondering what you guys use or ideas for keeping cool in the heat.. in the winter we can dress for warmth but in the summer when its 95+ degrees here is the normal attire i have to wear. long pants, t- shirt with 4 inch sleeves, hard hat, saftey glasses, and cut resistant gloves.drinking water all day only goes so far. What do you guys suggest?
They let you wear 4" sleeves? We have to wear long sleeves year round regardless of temp!
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
I struggle in the heat until I started bringing an extra cooler with cool water in it- not iced-. I took an old towel that would lay around my neck comfortably. Dip the towel in the water ring it out slightly and let the water do the work. I let it soak my shirt also. On really hot days you have to dip every 15 minutes or more. Works great for me.
 

cadpoint

Senior Member
Location
Durham, NC
I have usually only worked with companies that have a non energizied policy, and mostly in new construction. Only once did a company have a required dress code and that was for color only,
Northern rednecks! I've never heard of any local EC company stressing or requiring the requirements of what's required by NFPA. POCO is always long sleeves.

I can't wear ring collar tee shirts, I feel like I'm choking.

I wear (henley-shirts) three button short sleeves, three button down long sleeves for out in the weather work.
Full button down shirts with collar, or V-necks.

You might try wetting your wrist (where one would take ones pulse), this is refreshing and a "conduit" that one can use to dissipate heat in your arms. This is also mentioned in First-Aid training, to damp cloth the same area for heat stroke victims...

Good luck stay safe...
 
T

T.M.Haja Sahib

Guest
iwire
Not suitable for all kinds of electrical works?
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Adjusting hours when possible so you are not working during the hottest part of the day or at least not working in the sun, helps.
 

ptonsparky

Senior Member
Location
NE (9.06 miles @5.9 Degrees from Winged Horses)
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
I wear out quicker than my young help, but finding some shade for a few minutes and water, of course, helps. Advantage of this hot dry weather, no mosquitos so far this year. Irrigated fields normally are just thick with them, not so in the ones we have had to work. Maybe because the wells aren't working if we are there? Duh.:slaphead:
 

mivey

Senior Member

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I have something similar. Does yours have the bead stuff inside that swells up?

The website claims of 5-10 hours is bogus IMO. I keep two on hand and swap them out every so often. I left some in a cooler too long and they over-swelled and split some of the stitching.
They are still better than nothing. You can probably get 5-10 hours if you follow the conditions they did to get 5-10 hours.
 

WIMaster

Senior Member
Location
Wisconsin
I have something similar. Does yours have the bead stuff inside that swells up?

The website claims of 5-10 hours is bogus IMO. I keep two on hand and swap them out every so often. I left some in a cooler too long and they over-swelled and split some of the stitching.
Yes they do have the beads that swell up and no they do not seem to last 5-10.
I also keep more than one on hand in the cooler on very hot days and rotate them.
I did accidentally tear one open once, but haven't had a problem with overswelling.
 

ritelec

Senior Member
Location
Jersey
What do you guys suggest?

You could work on your roof for a couple of weeks while it's 95-100 degrees.......... after that you become acclimated and all other off roof stuff is no sweat.....

Not to be a smart ars, just the truth. Don't forget the sun block and plenty of fluids.
 
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