WiFi?

ptonsparky

Senior Member
Location
NE (9.06 miles @5.9 Degrees from Winged Horses)
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
My internet connection is slow. Well below the average. I don't want to add another weak link. I'm concerned with what occurs between in office computers and printer.

It does appear to be on the MB. I would know if I opened it. Research indicated disabling the original and putting in a card is possible. I most likely will not attempt it unless my local tech says go for it. I haven't had to open my last two desk tops. Prior to that, way too often. The picture of the service tag # was too blurry to read or I would have looked for parts VIA Dell.
 

caribconsult

Senior Member
Location
Añasco, Puerto Rico
Occupation
Retired computer consultant
I still disagree. Ultimate speed is likely limited by the broadband connection.
The US average is currently 192 MBS.
MBPS and mbps are not the same thing. B is bytes, b is bits. I don't know anyone who has 192 MBps connections unless the have a fiber optic line directly into the main trunk.
 

hillbilly1

Senior Member
Location
Atlanta,Ga
Occupation
Field coordinator/ technical support
My internet connection is slow. Well below the average. I don't want to add another weak link. I'm concerned with what occurs between in office computers and printer.

It does appear to be on the MB. I would know if I opened it. Research indicated disabling the original and putting in a card is possible. I most likely will not attempt it unless my local tech says go for it. I haven't had to open my last two desk tops. Prior to that, way too often. The picture of the service tag # was too blurry to read or I would have looked for parts VIA Dell.
You must be on Windstream (rebranded Kinetic, because Windstream has such a bad rep) or Frontier.
 

retirede

Senior Member
Location
Illinois
MBPS and mbps are not the same thing. B is bytes, b is bits. I don't know anyone who has 192 MBps connections unless the have a fiber optic line directly into the main trunk.

Whatever….the point is USB speed is measured in the same unit as Ethernet speed and 192 is still less than 480.
 

myspark

Senior Member
Location
SCV Ca, USA
Occupation
Retired EE
MBPS and mbps are not the same thing. B is bytes, b is bits. I don't know anyone who has 192 MBps connections unless the have a fiber optic line directly into the main trunk.
That speed [192] Mbps can be had with T1 connection and even higher.
It is MB as in Mega Bytes and Mbps for Megabits.

MB refers to capacity in terms of memory or storage while Megabits refer to data speed being transferred wirelessly.
But that’s so much for pedantry.

Now, back to the topic:

OK, let’s say you open [per OP] the PC to look at the MB (motherboard) . . . what would you expect to find to determine a faulty network card?
A network card (ethernet ) is a very simple component with no more than three [cheap] IC chips on it.
OP claims it’s Win 10 Desktop.
Windows 10 came out as a replacement for Windows NT and publicly distributed in 2015. It’s been used mostly as industrial use prior to 2015.

Between Win NT and Win 10 , there were many OS versions that came in between . . . ie. Millenium , Win 2000, Win 7 and Win 8.1 etc.
I went on special training on Microsoft Windows NT almost twenty five years ago when it was the OS favored by DoD.
It was basically written for industrial use.

It has been replaced many times since then. I’ve done a lot of work for the government.
The likelihood of the unit [network card] being bad is possible—but highly unlikely. I’ve never seen a card burned out. . . .not from a Windows 10.
It is not a dinosaur as in really old.

I try not to make this comment sounds gospel because OP only trusts his local tech “unless my local tech says go for it” – and I understand.
It’s one’s prerogative to do anything he thinks is right. It could be a simple bad ethernet cable or something else like loose card etc.
I’m just doling out my two cents.

For anyone with marginal knowledge of Computer Engineering—I would suggest get a new PC instead of “fighting fire” as suggested by other posts,

My suggestion:

If prepping for retirement, switch to UNIX (Linux) for hassle-free OS . . . it comes with excellent support, upgraded regularly. . . . and it’s free.
It can do almost anything a Micro-bloat Windows can do. ;)

Good luck.

………….
 

ptonsparky

Senior Member
Location
NE (9.06 miles @5.9 Degrees from Winged Horses)
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Had a little time to spare today and took wireless USB adapter to the office. Decided I would check both patch cords from Problem Desk Top to another known working jack. Worked fine. Original cord back to original jack. Works fine. Everything back to as it was before. All works fine.

The only thing different is the desk top has been shut down entirely since Friday.

Hard to fix if it's not broke.
 

DrSparks

The Everlasting Know-it-all!
Location
Madison, WI, USA
Occupation
Master Electrician and General Contractor
Whatever….the point is USB speed is measured in the same unit as Ethernet speed and 192 is still less than 480.
Even if his connection is slower than USB 2 now, why would you want to limit yourself. This is a silly argument. USB 3 and 1 gig Ethernet are standard now.

Sent from my BE2028 using Tapatalk
 

DrSparks

The Everlasting Know-it-all!
Location
Madison, WI, USA
Occupation
Master Electrician and General Contractor
Actually, engineers refer to data transfer speeds in terms of baud, which is actual electrical switches per second. Mbps does not take into consideration parity bits and error correction.

Sent from my BE2028 using Tapatalk
 

GoldDigger

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Placerville, CA, USA
Occupation
Retired PV System Designer
Actually, engineers refer to data transfer speeds in terms of baud, which is actual electrical switches per second. Mbps does not take into consideration parity bits and error correction.

Sent from my BE2028 using Tapatalk
Not quite true.
Baud is the number of symbol changes per second. If using Quadrature Amplitude Modulation, for example, one symbol might easily be 32 bits. If the signal is binary, such as on or off, + or minus, then the baud rate is equal to the bit rate.
But common usage ignores that distinction.

Edit: Make that 8 bits per symbol.
Bits per symbol ~ log2(distinct values per symbol) It is hard to get beyond 12 bits per symbol on a real world channel. (Thanks, synchro)
 
Last edited:

DrSparks

The Everlasting Know-it-all!
Location
Madison, WI, USA
Occupation
Master Electrician and General Contractor
Not quite true.
Baud is the number of symbol changes per second. If using Quadrature Amplitude Modulation, for example, one symbol might easily be 32 bits. If the signal is binary, such as on or off, + or minus, then the baud rate is equal to the bit rate.
But common usage ignores that distinction.
Yeah, good ol analog days. Good point though.

Sent from my BE2028 using Tapatalk
 
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