Will ranges need GFCI receptacles?

mbrooke

Senior Member
I'm reading within 6 feet of a sink, but how is that measured? I can see tons of arguments as to why its not needed.

240 volt dryers will also need a GFCI- but- depends on what is defined as area. ;)
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
Now you’ve opened a can of worms...

“In dwelling units, GFCI protection has expanded to include both 125- and 250-volt receptacles supplied by a single-phase circuit at 150 volts or less to ground. The code making panel also revised the requirement in basements to include all of the basement, whether it is finished or not. The biggest impact this will have is requiring GFCI protection for dryers and ranges, if the range receptacle is within 6 feet of the sink. Since one of the options likely to be used for this protection is a GFCI circuit breaker at the branch circuit supply, it will be important to make note of what level the device is set to trip at. This could mean the difference between ground-fault protection for personnel or ground-fault protection for equipment.”

https://www.nfpa.org/News-and-Resear...20-NEC-Changes

and it’s measured from the outside edge of the sink.
 

mbrooke

Senior Member
Now you’ve opened a can of worms...

“In dwelling units, GFCI protection has expanded to include both 125- and 250-volt receptacles supplied by a single-phase circuit at 150 volts or less to ground. The code making panel also revised the requirement in basements to include all of the basement, whether it is finished or not. The biggest impact this will have is requiring GFCI protection for dryers and ranges, if the range receptacle is within 6 feet of the sink. Since one of the options likely to be used for this protection is a GFCI circuit breaker at the branch circuit supply, it will be important to make note of what level the device is set to trip at. This could mean the difference between ground-fault protection for personnel or ground-fault protection for equipment.”

https://www.nfpa.org/News-and-Resear...20-NEC-Changes

and it’s measured from the outside edge of the sink.
Down to the stove outlet or to the stove itself?
 

kwired

Electron manager
Now you’ve opened a can of worms...

“In dwelling units, GFCI protection has expanded to include both 125- and 250-volt receptacles supplied by a single-phase circuit at 150 volts or less to ground. The code making panel also revised the requirement in basements to include all of the basement, whether it is finished or not. The biggest impact this will have is requiring GFCI protection for dryers and ranges, if the range receptacle is within 6 feet of the sink. Since one of the options likely to be used for this protection is a GFCI circuit breaker at the branch circuit supply, it will be important to make note of what level the device is set to trip at. This could mean the difference between ground-fault protection for personnel or ground-fault protection for equipment.

https://www.nfpa.org/News-and-Resear...20-NEC-Changes

and it’s measured from the outside edge of the sink.
I realize that is a quote from someone else, but again unless there was a major overhaul to 210.8, the protection in that section has always been about personnel protection and needs to be Class A GFCI protection.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Not at my house.
I think for now it won't affect most ranges other than if in a basement or a garage. Not very often is a range directly adjacent to a sink.

AFAIK the rule still applies where there is a receptacle - could always "hardwire" those appliances though it is not necessarily that practical.
 

mbrooke

Senior Member
I think for now it won't affect most ranges other than if in a basement or a garage. Not very often is a range directly adjacent to a sink.

AFAIK the rule still applies where there is a receptacle - could always "hardwire" those appliances though it is not necessarily that practical.
But can't a j-box be considered an outlet? I know receptacle does not mean such, but if they changed the wording to outlet it would apply I think.
 

kwired

Electron manager
But can't a j-box be considered an outlet? I know receptacle does not mean such, but if they changed the wording to outlet it would apply I think.
Like I said unless they did a major overhaul to 210.8, parts A and B only apply to receptacle outlets with voltage and current ratings stated and in the locations mentioned.

Parts C and D apply whether there is a receptacle or not - that is your boat hoists and dishwashers.

All other GFCI requirements are in articles specific to their application.
 

mbrooke

Senior Member
Like I said unless they did a major overhaul to 210.8, parts A and B only apply to receptacle outlets with voltage and current ratings stated and in the locations mentioned.

Parts C and D apply whether there is a receptacle or not - that is your boat hoists and dishwashers.

All other GFCI requirements are in articles specific to their application.
Got it :)
 
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