Working in NJ

guschash

Senior Member
Location
Ohio
Will it be ok for me to work in NJ? My sister in law ,mother in law home was affected by the storm and I volunteered to help rebuilt her home. Will I be able to re wire her home if I not license in NJ ( my license is in Ohio). I don't plan on do any other wiring but hers.
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Will it be ok for me to work in NJ? My sister in law ,mother in law home was affected by the storm and I volunteered to help rebuilt her home. Will I be able to re wire her home if I not license in NJ ( my license is in Ohio). I don't plan on do any other wiring but hers.
I doubt it unless they allow the homeowner to do their own work. Some areas make you take a test. I have an uncle and 2 cousins whose homes were flooded at Breezy Point. One lost 4 cars and their home was flooded. It is a mess over there.
 

A/A Fuel GTX

Senior Member
Location
WI & AZ
With all the destruction and mayhem in that area, one would think ANY licensed electrician would be welcomed with open arms. The red tape between states is ridiculous. If I remember correctly, the "N" in NEC stands for national as in all the states...........
 

jumper

Senior Member
Many states, and I believe NJ is one of them, will allow a homeowner or a family member to work on the homeowner's residence. The family member must do it as a volunteer and not receive any monetary payment. Cookies or a home cooked meal are allowed.:)
 

JES2727

Senior Member
Location
NJ
Many states, and I believe NJ is one of them, will allow a homeowner or a family member to work on the homeowner's residence. The family member must do it as a volunteer and not receive any monetary payment. Cookies or a home cooked meal are allowed.:)
That pretty much sums it up. A homeowner may pull permits for the single family dwelling that they occupy, and enlist family members and others to "help'' them, unpaid of course. If it's a rental or multi-family then they must hire a licensed contractor.
 

billdozier 78

Member
Location
Orlando
Fuel I agree but sadly due to shoddy contractors looking for the quick buck these rules need to be applied. Is there a way to hold those out of town contractors responsible for skipping out of town? Then you also have to factor in price gouging as well. Saw it first hand in Alabama after Ivan.
 

ceb58

Senior Member
Location
Raeford, NC
Many states, and I believe NJ is one of them, will allow a homeowner or a family member to work on the homeowner's residence. The family member must do it as a volunteer and not receive any monetary payment. Cookies or a home cooked meal are allowed.:)
You are cheap:D
 

Gold

Member
Location
US
If they pull there own permit and sell within 7 years they will need a certification by a licensed contractor before the buyer can get a C of O. (may be 4 years)

There may also be some insurance issues I've heard of at least one carrier who after a home was rebuilt charged a higher premium because the homeowner did all the work himself. He then got a certification from an electrical and, plumbing contractor to offset that premium.
 

Gold

Member
Location
US
I think this is the result of one instance where a few people (that don't represent the sentiment of the entire state) had imposed there unwarranted self importance on an out of state contractor. Unfortunately this will shadow all of the goodwill and community support for a long time.

1 bad apple ...
 

guschash

Senior Member
Location
Ohio
I wasn't planning on charging her. Our family members were planning on doing the work for her. She doesn't have a lot of money and has lived there all her life. She is close to 90, there is no way she could do any work herself.
 

jumper

Senior Member
I wasn't planning on charging her. Our family members were planning on doing the work for her. She doesn't have a lot of money and has lived there all her life. She is close to 90, there is no way she could do any work herself.
You and your family should be fine helping her.

I would PM Rick Napier and check the rules, he is a member here and a NJ inspector.
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
They may make some exceptions considering the situation but you never know. Hopefully they will work with you on it. Good luck
 

ceb58

Senior Member
Location
Raeford, NC
I wasn't planning on charging her. Our family members were planning on doing the work for her. She doesn't have a lot of money and has lived there all her life. She is close to 90, there is no way she could do any work herself.
Is there going to be any insurance claims involved.
 

goldstar

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
As far as I know there is no reciprocity between NJ and other states with respect to licenses and business permits. Technically speaking, I'm not supposed to even "help" my neighbor do any electrical work as a licensed electrician. Anyone without a NJ license and a business permit cannot legally contract electrical work with the public. Having said that, if a HO wants to pull a permit and assume all responsibility he is permitted to do so. You can write a check to a relative but not "specifically" for electrical work.

BTW, Mike Holt had once published a list of states and their licensing policies. If I find it I'll post it here.
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Professional Engineer, Fire & Life Safety
If they pull there own permit and sell within 7 years they will need a certification by a licensed contractor before the buyer can get a C of O. (may be 4 years)

There may also be some insurance issues I've heard of at least one carrier who after a home was rebuilt charged a higher premium because the homeowner did all the work himself. He then got a certification from an electrical and, plumbing contractor to offset that premium.
I do not believe this is true in New Jersey. I have never heard, or read in the Uniform Construction Code, any such requirement.
 

Gold

Member
Location
US
I do not believe this is true in New Jersey. I have never heard, or read in the Uniform Construction Code, any such requirement.
Maybe it isn't, but I get calls every week for certifications required by multiple twps for C of O for this very thing. Your experience may vary I suppose.

Perhaps then the best advice to the OP is to not take the advice from EC's actually doing business in NJ and go ahead and call His grandmothers AHJ.
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Professional Engineer, Fire & Life Safety
Maybe it isn't, but I get calls every week for certifications required by multiple twps for C of O for this very thing. Your experience may vary I suppose.

Perhaps then the best advice to the OP is to not take the advice from EC's actually doing business in NJ and go ahead and call His grandmothers AHJ.
Forget the local AHJ, call the Board of Examiners of Electrical Contractors. The AHJ has nothing to do with it.
 

Gold

Member
Location
US
Forget the local AHJ, call the Board of Examiners of Electrical Contractors. The AHJ has nothing to do with it.
So your advice to the OP (who wants to fix his grandmothers house) is not to call the AHJ but to call the BOEE?


Yeah go with that.↑↑


He isn't looking to become a contractor here, he wants to help his grandmother.
 
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