Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Finishing someone else's work

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    Originally posted by shputnik View Post
    Had a home owner call me to finish a project that another Electrician didn't finish....for one reason or another....it's a kitchen remodel....

    How would you bid it? I can't see me doing it for anything but time and material because I don't know what loose ends there are.


    I'm new to the estimating side of things
    Don't run from a job like this. Proceed with caution and CHARGE LARGE! And ask for payment daily if that's what it takes.

    Comment


      #17
      Originally posted by norcal View Post
      Crouse-Hinds was Murray, and Murray is the successor company, since Siemens bought the Crouse-Hinds distribution line from Cooper, and restored the original name, the breaker catalog numbers should be the same. Crouse-Hinds did list ITE, EQ-P, and EQ-T, Bryant BR, as acceptable in a lot of loadcenters, Murray is the OEM replacement though.
      BR line is part of Eaton now, and this may lead to some confusion of what is acceptable today.
      I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

      Comment


        #18
        Originally posted by shputnik View Post
        The general contractor is the home owner.... actually has a license as a contractor

        I'm not familiar with how liability insurance works....I'm going to call my insurance provider later


        Things happen....it's the price of running a business....i just want to make sure I'm covered by liability.
        If the owner is a contractor does he have a permit for the job and if so was there a rough inspection? The original EC should be on record for the rough-in.

        If they passed a rough inspection then the rest of the work on a kitchen remodel is much like service work. You install receptacles all the time on circuits installed by others with no option to open walls and check the wiring.

        I don't know how things work in your area but here if another electrician is listed as the electrician of record on a job then they must be officially replaced on the permit before work continues. The original EC has to sign a document saying that he had quite the job and close out his permit and that all financial matters are settled.
        The 95% of people that you can't trust give the other 5% a bad name.

        Comment


          #19
          Sometimes people just don't get along and decide to split ways even if neither has really done anything wrong.

          Maybe the other EC was the one that did something that didn't go well with client, not all clients are bad. Fact the client is a GC, maybe complicates things, maybe wasn't a good GC if you asked the other EC about him?

          Be clear what you will or will not do and proceed at your own risk.
          I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

          Comment


            #20
            We did a kitchen remodel recently. The GC handled everything. He included a cost for electrical in his original bid to us. However, once the walls and ceiling were uncovered, it was clear that the existing wiring was, at best, hack work. The GC gave me a price for the additional electrical work. I approved the change order. I was present at the city's cover inspection and final inspection. I know, from personally seeing the new wiring, that the job was done properly. The extra costs were well worth it to me, as I know the kitchen wiring is safe.

            That is the experience an EC and a GC should get from the homeowners. I can't tell if you are looking at a similar experience, or at an unexpected disaster. I hope it is the former.
            Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
            Comments based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by sameguy View Post
              You sound like you are hungry, don't let the need for work cloud your judgement. I would rather lose money on bidding and not getting jobs than winning and getting hosed, tread lightly, do your homework. GC personal work will be a pita.
              I don't know. GC personal work can be great. All depends on the GC. The GC's I did work for were top notch. Cheap wasn't the name of the game with them. I didn't work with cheapskates.

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by Chamuit View Post
                I don't know. GC personal work can be great. All depends on the GC. The GC's I did work for were top notch. Cheap wasn't the name of the game with them. I didn't work with cheapskates.
                That's the ticket!

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by shputnik View Post
                  The general contractor is the home owner.... actually has a license as a contractor

                  I'm not familiar with how liability insurance works....I'm going to call my insurance provider later


                  Things happen....it's the price of running a business....i just want to make sure I'm covered by liability.
                  There is one thing people forget to check, and in this case it may not hold true, dose he own the house? I had a situation where the renters took it on them selves to do a remodel and called me to do the electrical. For what ever reason the stars were aligned and I knew the guy that owned the house. He was not happy about the demo with out his permission.
                  Organized people are people that are just too lazy to look for their stuff

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by growler View Post
                    How many jobs have you ever walked away from in the middle ? If you do there will probably be a good reason.

                    Did they get an inspection on the job? Who holds the permit?

                    There may not even have been another electrician the homeowner may have gotten in over his/her head.
                    Or someone had trouble getting paid.
                    I can build anything you want if you draw a picture of it on the back of a big enough check.

                    [COLOR=red]There's no substitute for hard work....but that doesn't mean I'm going to give up trying to find one.[/COLOR]

                    John Childress
                    Electrical Inspector
                    IAEI / CEI / C10
                    Certified Electrical Inspector

                    Comment


                      #25
                      I don't understand how hard it would be to find out the contractor of record on the permit.

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Originally posted by cdslotz View Post
                        I don't understand how hard it would be to find out the contractor of record on the permit.
                        I agree that it shouldn't be hard but sometimes it just is.

                        Example. Here on small jobs the posted permit only has the permit number and the GC listed.If you take that permit number to the permit office and ask for any information about the permit they will not give it out. I guess they assume that if you are dealing with the GC on the job you can find out all the information you need from them.

                        If I get a call about taking over a job I'm going to ask who started the job and if they refuse to give out this information that's enough of a red flag for me.
                        The 95% of people that you can't trust give the other 5% a bad name.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally posted by shputnik View Post
                          The general contractor is the home owner.... actually has a license as a contractor...
                          Those have been the worst homeowners I've ever worked for. They know exactly how to screw the little contractors into getting anything they want for little to no extra cost.

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Originally posted by growler View Post
                            I agree that it shouldn't be hard but sometimes it just is.

                            Example. Here on small jobs the posted permit only has the permit number and the GC listed.If you take that permit number to the permit office and ask for any information about the permit they will not give it out. I guess they assume that if you are dealing with the GC on the job you can find out all the information you need from them.

                            If I get a call about taking over a job I'm going to ask who started the job and if they refuse to give out this information that's enough of a red flag for me.
                            Here once the job is finished, the permit becomes public record, but prior to that, it's non of your business what someone is doing. We have people file complaints and then call back to find out the status, I tell them its confidential, they usually claim that they filed the complaint, I tell them I know and now I'm taking care of it and now it's NOYB.
                            I can build anything you want if you draw a picture of it on the back of a big enough check.

                            [COLOR=red]There's no substitute for hard work....but that doesn't mean I'm going to give up trying to find one.[/COLOR]

                            John Childress
                            Electrical Inspector
                            IAEI / CEI / C10
                            Certified Electrical Inspector

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Good work pays of just be patient.

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Originally posted by GoldDigger View Post
                                Not only loose ends, but potentially hidden flaws inside walls. A lot of folks are not comfortable taking over with the walls closed unless they know the original contractor's work.
                                Personally I would find out who the previous electrician was and contact him. Just to find out his reasoning as to why he walked away. There are always two sides to a story and the truth is in the middle. If it was due to a nonpayment you dont want to screw yourself over.

                                Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X