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How to Protect Electrical Service from Flood Zone

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  • tom baker
    replied
    There is no maximum height, just 6-7 to the center of the switch from platform,and accessible, and that can be on a second story. Keep in mind the service entrance conductors are unfused and there are limits on running them inside a building, which vary greatly by jurisdiction (or encase in concrete).

    Leave a comment:


  • kwired
    replied
    Originally posted by brantmacga View Post
    Idk the specifics of where you are, but in my area it’s typically 12” minimum above flood plane. If this puts your disconnect over 6’-7”, a platform that meets minimum working space dimensions is required.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    But OP says this is in a basement, presumably in a basement in an area where flooding may be likely. That IMO changes things, and can depend on what measures are taken to prevent the basement itself from flooding.

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  • brantmacga
    replied
    Originally posted by BatmanisWatching1987 View Post
    Thank you for the help.

    What code section would I need to look up for maximum height for panels and disconnect when in a flood zone?
    Idk the specifics of where you are, but in my area it’s typically 12” minimum above flood plane. If this puts your disconnect over 6’-7”, a platform that meets minimum working space dimensions is required.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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  • Wire-Smith
    replied
    Originally posted by jap View Post
    True,

    That, and, I doubt the installing contractor ever actually knows just how good a seal they've made a couple of years after leaving the project.

    The best penetration into a basement below grade level is no penetration at all.


    JAP>
    coming up from the floor in an enlarged sump chamber seemed alright to me, you just have to get there early to make it seem practical to most people.

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  • jap
    replied
    Originally posted by kwired View Post
    My guess is said basement probably also has drainage tile, sump pump, fill near the wall is something that will drain easily, etc. and to a certain extent you don't really need a perfect seal.
    True,

    That, and, I doubt the installing contractor ever actually knows just how good a seal they've made a couple of years after leaving the project.

    The best penetration into a basement below grade level is no penetration at all.


    JAP>

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  • kwired
    replied
    Originally posted by Cow View Post
    I disagree.

    For reference, we just ran three 4 inch conduits into a basement 3' below the water table.

    If you have the hole cored properly, and use a linkseal, combined with polywater fst foam, there will not be an issue.

    https://www.polywater.com/product/po...-duct-sealant/

    http://www.cooperindustries.com/cont...orconduit.html
    My guess is said basement probably also has drainage tile, sump pump, fill near the wall is something that will drain easily, etc. and to a certain extent you don't really need a perfect seal.

    Leave a comment:


  • Cow
    replied
    Originally posted by jap View Post

    There's no good way to seal off such a penetration.


    JAP>
    I disagree.

    For reference, we just ran three 4 inch conduits into a basement 3' below the water table.

    If you have the hole cored properly, and use a linkseal, combined with polywater fst foam, there will not be an issue.

    https://www.polywater.com/product/po...-duct-sealant/

    http://www.cooperindustries.com/cont...orconduit.html

    Leave a comment:


  • readydave8
    replied
    Originally posted by jap View Post

    There's no good way to seal off such a penetration.


    JAP>
    hydraulic cement

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  • jap
    replied
    We penetrated a bank basement wall below grade and another guy hit the yard sprinkler system and it flooded the basement through the penetration we made.

    Never again will I penetrate a basement wall below grade without someone else signing off on it first.

    There's no good way to seal off such a penetration.


    JAP>

    Leave a comment:


  • kwired
    replied
    [COLOR=#333333] Originally Posted by kwired [/COLOR]
    [COLOR=#333333]The compromise - penetrated the wall nearly 8 feet below grade-[/COLOR]
    Originally posted by jap View Post
    Shame on you,,,,


    JAP>
    It did get me into some trouble, I hit a water line while excavating that I wasn't even thinking about being there. Normally I am never deep enough to be concerned about water lines. 1-1/4 line lets out a lot of water pretty fast too, luckily there was a shut off in the room we were bringing service into and it didn't run for very long.

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  • jap
    replied
    Originally posted by kwired View Post
    The compromise - penetrated the wall nearly 8 feet below grade-

    Shame on you,,,,


    JAP>

    Leave a comment:


  • Cow
    replied
    Originally posted by Wire-Smith View Post
    put equipment high enough and build a standing platform around the equipment for servicing.
    I haven't done it, but I have seen pictures of equipment mounted this way, up high on platforms with stair access.

    May be expensive up front, but at least you aren't replacing the panel and other electrical components every time it floods....

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  • sameguy
    replied
    Never said it would be cheap or easy!

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  • hbiss
    replied
    Loooong home runs?

    -Hal

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  • kwired
    replied
    Originally posted by sameguy View Post
    Move it to a dryer climate?
    OP is in NJ, you suggesting to put his equipment in AZ?

    Leave a comment:

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