Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Crawlspace shuffle

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Crawlspace shuffle

    Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCF4576.JPG
Views:	266
Size:	97.7 KB
ID:	2534887Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCF4579.JPG
Views:	224
Size:	86.8 KB
ID:	2534888 New one for me - from the meter, the service conductors travel in plastic conduit along a crawlspace floor... travel length I estimate to be about 40 feet. The conduit then travels through the foundation to the service panel cabinet (circuit breakers) in the full basement. Also, notice the use of masonry blocks to support a section and the conduit lacks any other support/lateral restraint.. Is this legit?
    Tony Shupenko, PE

    #2
    Nice, clean crawl space!

    Is there a main disconnect at the meter?

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by PaulMmn View Post
      Nice, clean crawl space!

      Is there a main disconnect at the meter?
      no
      Tony Shupenko, PE

      Comment


        #4
        Since there is no service disconnect on the outside of the building the conduit run in the crawlspace need to be encased in 2" of concrete.

        Rob

        Moderator

        All responses based on the 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted

        Comment


          #5
          I agree with Infinity. It was the very same point I planned to make, before noticing that he beat me to it. Though I suspect it would be easier to install a disconnect outside, make that the service point, and do whatever other changes are needed with regard to bonding and separating neutrals and grounds.
          Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
          Comments based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

          Comment


            #6
            Click image for larger version

Name:	DSCF4389.JPG
Views:	261
Size:	106.9 KB
ID:	2534905
            Tony Shupenko, PE

            Comment


              #7
              Would seem to be 'easy' to run a 4th conductor down the duct in the crawl space and install a disconnect at the meter.

              And some more questions:
              What's the orange 'pipe' running off from behind the meter.

              Is that an extension cord coiled up in there?

              What's that other pipe in between the conduits to the meter housing?

              And what's strapped to one of the conduits into the meter housing?
              Looks like a hose bib to the left of the conduits.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by PaulMmn View Post
                Would seem to be 'easy' to run a 4th conductor down the duct in the crawl space and install a disconnect at the meter.

                And some more questions:
                What's the orange 'pipe' running off from behind the meter.

                Is that an extension cord coiled up in there? [COLOR=#FF0000]No that looks like the cable company underground wiring which is run in the orange inner duct.[/COLOR]

                What's that other pipe in between the conduits to the meter housing? [COLOR=#FF0000]Maybe for the GEC to the ground rods?[/COLOR]

                And what's strapped to one of the conduits into the meter housing? [COLOR=#FF0000] CATV?[/COLOR]
                Looks like a hose bib to the left of the conduits.
                Yes that's a hose bib.

                Rob

                Moderator

                All responses based on the 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted

                Comment


                  #9
                  Wonder why they didn’t run SER and secure it to the bottom of the joist


                  Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by PaulMmn View Post
                    Would seem to be 'easy' to run a 4th conductor down the duct in the crawl space and install a disconnect at the meter.

                    And some more questions:
                    What's the orange 'pipe' running off from behind the meter.

                    Is that an extension cord coiled up in there?

                    What's that other pipe in between the conduits to the meter housing?

                    And what's strapped to one of the conduits into the meter housing?
                    Looks like a hose bib to the left of the conduits.
                    Orange cable is cut off... not used... and is routed in the orange pipe.

                    Could not trace what the conduit in between serviced.
                    Tony Shupenko, PE

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by sparky1118 View Post
                      Wonder why they didn’t run SER and secure it to the bottom of the joist


                      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
                      It would still have been an excessive length of service conductors inside the building. Possibly the installer thought that it would be OK if run in conduit. (It's not.,..)

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by GoldDigger View Post

                        It would still have been an excessive length of service conductors inside the building. Possibly the installer thought that it would be OK if run in conduit. (It's not.,..)
                        Regardless with how much SER is run in the building if it was done properly with a meter main it wouldn’t of mattered the length of the run.


                        Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

                        Comment


                          #13
                          the NEC does not have limit on how far unfused service entrance conductors can run in a building, but often local jurisdictions do. In Washington, its 15 feet of raceway. If this installation was in WA,then the raceway would be encased in 2" of concrete, or a disconnect installed at the meter, then the raceway is a feeder.
                          Moderator-Washington State
                          Ancora Imparo

                          Comment


                            #14
                            The NEC language, "nearest the point of entry" indeed does not set a hard limit, leaving it up to local AHJs to interpret either by setting their own measurements or normalizing a more flexible case by case judgement. But I doubt that any jurisdiction, when asked, would say that the OP's example is compliant.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by GoldDigger View Post
                              The NEC language, "nearest the point of entry" indeed does not set a hard limit, leaving it up to local AHJs to interpret either by setting their own measurements or normalizing a more flexible case by case judgement. But I doubt that any jurisdiction, when asked, would say that the OP's example is compliant.
                              In Tony's jurisdiction it would not be compliant unless that elbow turned up directly into the service disconnect.
                              Rob

                              Moderator

                              All responses based on the 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X