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    Peninsula Receptacle

    Just want to get clarification on the peninsula receptacle requirement. At this particular job I am looking at, they have a peninsula that extends out from a wall approx. 5ft. There is no other counter that connects to this peninsula.
    There is an existing receptacle at counter height on the wall where the peninsula starts, obviously placed there to serve the peninsula. Wouldn't this meet the requirement for the one receptacle.

    #2
    I would say it counts.
    Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
    Comments based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

    Comment


      #3
      I say that you need another receptacle on the peninsula. The one on the wall is serving the wall space not the peninsula.

      (3) Peninsular Countertop Spaces. At least one receptacle outlet shall be installed at each peninsular countertop space with a long dimension of 600 mm (24 in.) or greater and a short dimension of 300 mm (12 in.) or greater. A peninsular countertop is measured from the connecting edge.
      Rob

      Moderator

      All responses based on the 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted

      Comment


        #4
        I just found a Mike Holt illustration that shows a receptacle at the wall and one further down on the peninsula. It seems to be a gray area as far as that section of the code goes. I guess its better to be safe than sorry and just assume that an additional receptacle is needed.

        Thanks

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by titan1021 View Post
          I just found a Mike Holt illustration that shows a receptacle at the wall and one further down on the peninsula. It seems to be a gray area as far as that section of the code goes. I guess its better to be safe than sorry and just assume that an additional receptacle is needed.

          Thanks

          I agree with you on the gray part. The code wording doesn't seem to address this situation directly. IMO you could see it either way.
          Rob

          Moderator

          All responses based on the 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by infinity View Post
            I say that you need another receptacle on the peninsula. The one on the wall is serving the wall space not the peninsula.
            You would not consider one "at counter height on the wall where the peninsula starts, obviously placed there to serve the peninsula" to be "installed at each peninsular countertop space"?

            It does not define "at". I think an outlet located above the couter-top on the wall the peninsula connects to meets the letter and intent.
            With great power comes great resistance - times current squared, of course.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by charlie b View Post
              I would say it counts.
              I say it don't. :grin:. The outlet on the wall covers the cabinet at that point. Remember the peninsula starts at the connecting edge to the cabinet.

              One can look at it either way but I believe the NEC is saying that the cabinets attached to the wall are pertaining to the wall and the island would start 2' (usually) off the wall where it connects to the cabinet.
              They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
              She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
              I can't help it if I'm lucky

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Volta View Post
                It does not define "at". I think an outlet located above the couter-top on the wall the peninsula connects to meets the letter and intent.

                Read art. 210.52(C)(3) last sentence. I believe the intent was as I mentioned above.
                They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
                She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
                I can't help it if I'm lucky

                Comment


                  #9
                  What cabinet?
                  With great power comes great resistance - times current squared, of course.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
                    Read art. 210.52(C)(3) last sentence. I believe the intent was as I mentioned above.
                    Okay, so if a 12" wide peninsula extends from the wall 24" or more, it needs an outlet installed "at" the peninsula. Why would it need to be located at the non-wall end? It only needs to be installed "at" the peninsula. There is no 2'/4' rule here.
                    With great power comes great resistance - times current squared, of course.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Start with a kitchen wall that has absolutely nothing connected to it - no countertops and no cabinets. Then slide this peninsula into that wall. This does not establish any "wall countertop spaces," as addressed in 210.52(C)(1). Rather, it establishes a "peninsular countertop space," as addressed in 210.52(C)(3).
                      Originally posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
                      Read art. 210.52(C)(3) last sentence. I believe the intent was as I mentioned above.
                      What that sentence says to me is that the peninsular countertop space begins at the point at which the peninsula's countertop touches the wall. So the receptacle in that wall counts as the required one. That's how I see it, anyway.
                      Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
                      Comments based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
                        I say it don't. :grin:. The outlet on the wall covers the cabinet at that point. Remember the peninsula starts at the connecting edge to the cabinet.

                        One can look at it either way but I believe the NEC is saying that the cabinets attached to the wall are pertaining to the wall and the island would start 2' (usually) off the wall where it connects to the cabinet.
                        There is only a peninsula attached to the wall so where is the cabinet with the connecting edge?
                        Rob

                        Moderator

                        All responses based on the 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Dennis, are you talking about the cabinet under the peninsular countertop? Or are you presuming that the wall itself has an "upper cabinet" located above the point of connection of the peninsula?
                          Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
                          Comments based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by charlie b View Post
                            Start with a kitchen wall that has absolutely nothing connected to it - no countertops and no cabinets. Then slide this peninsula into that wall. This does not establish any "wall countertop spaces," as addressed in 210.52(C)(1). Rather, it establishes a "peninsular countertop space," as addressed in 210.52(C)(3). What that sentence says to me is that the peninsular countertop space begins at the point at which the peninsula's countertop touches the wall. So the receptacle in that wall counts as the required one. That's how I see it, anyway.
                            Thats the way I see it as well

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I don't have a handbook but my understanding was the peninsula starts where the it meets the cabinet that are along the wall. Why would the CMP put in the verbiage that the peninsula countertop is measured from the connecting edge. It would not be necessary if the recep. on the wall satisfied the requirement.

                              In the case of a peninsula coming straight out of the wall then I would call the first 2' cabinet and anything beyond that peninsula. The outlet on the wall covers the cabinets n the wall, IMO and another is needed on the peninsula to be code compliant.

                              We must have a recep. within 24" of the end of the counter. Then in your case a recep. would never be needed on the peninsula. Why even mention it in the code then. It would be totally useless.

                              I will stick to my guns. One on the wall and another is need for the part that extends beyond 2' of the cabinets.
                              They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
                              She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
                              I can't help it if I'm lucky

                              Comment

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