1 day job turning into a 2 day job - question about adjusting the original price

Fred B

Senior Member
Location
Upstate, NY
Occupation
Electrician
Report unlicensed scabs like handymen! Report at state level.
That is a problem in that here, there is no licensing requirements statewide, just in a few local municipalities. I've commented on in other thread that we have the wild west of electrical workers, anybody can do it. But they still are "suppose to" abide by the code, but if they don't get an inspection there is no enforcement.
 

Frank Licata

Member
Location
Massachusetts
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
That is a problem in that here, there is no licensing requirements statewide, just in a few local municipalities. I've commented on in other thread that we have the wild west of electrical workers, anybody can do it. But they still are "suppose to" abide by the code, but if they don't get an inspection there is no enforcement.
File legislation to fix that. Be the change that you want to see.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
If most the extra cost is unexpected labor it is easier to eat that cost than if there is a lot of additional materials cost. Presumably you are marking up materials so unless there is a lot of extra material you likely still come out ok on those, just not as much profit as expected.

Always figure the worst case you can think of happening when estimating, even then add a little padding just in case and do look at things like crawlspaces to be sure they are accessible if you know you will be depending on that access.

It is easier to talk customer into a lower price afterward than a higher price.

With rising product prices it may be understandable that things will go up. But if anything went up a significant amount it needs brought up as soon as possible, on just a one or two day project that probably means bring it up at the start or be willing to compromise on cost.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
IMO this is a mistake. You should charge a minimum of double what your helper cost you.
And your helper should be costing you his hourly rate, overtime if it is something that regularly happens, payroll taxes, insurance, any other benefits you provide plus there is often going to be some "non billable hours" you have to pay him as well. If you charge customer same rate you pay the help you will come out behind.
 

sparky1118

Senior Member
Location
Massachusetts
Occupation
Master Electrician
When I first started out I ran into this issue a lot. However now at the bottom of all my proposals / estimates I put in bold print “this is only an estimate. Actually costs will be based upon time and materials” ever since I put that note in all my estimates I haven’t ever lost any money for an estimate.


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