15 amp circuits 2020 code

dhsvcs

Member
Location
miami
Occupation
electrician
I was told by a P.E. that in Broward County, Fl. if a residential load center is changed by more than 25%, all the circuits in that panel are required to be a minimum of 20 amps.
Even in a 1 or 2 bedroom condo remodel. I understand about receptacles in pantry and similar to dining room type areas, but bedrooms and general lighting ? Kitchen and bathroom lighting ? Smoke alarm circuits ?

Have 15 amp circuits been eliminated from residential work in the 2020 NEC code ?
 

480sparky

Senior Member
Location
Iowegia
My question is...... 25% of what? Total circuits? Calculated load? Square footage of the house?

I find it hard to believe there's a local code that demands all existing circuits be converted to 20a based on a change of a few.
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Professional Engineer, Fire & Life Safety
I was told by a P.E. that in Broward County, Fl. if a residential load center is changed by more than 25%, all the circuits in that panel are required to be a minimum of 20 amps.
Even in a 1 or 2 bedroom condo remodel. I understand about receptacles in pantry and similar to dining room type areas, but bedrooms and general lighting ? Kitchen and bathroom lighting ? Smoke alarm circuits ?

Have 15 amp circuits been eliminated from residential work in the 2020 NEC code ?
Request the PE provide you with the code section or amendment that requires this. If he tries to bluff, call him on it.
 

Rock86

Senior Member
Location
new york
Occupation
Electrical Engineer / Electrician
That's insane. Good luck telling grandma her $1200 service upgrade is now going to cost $20,000 because you need to rewire the house.
 

steve66

Senior Member
Location
Illinois
Occupation
Engineer
15 AMP branch circuits are generally allowed by the NEC for circuits with smaller total load.

The main general exception I can think of is for the 2 Small Appliance Branch Circuits, which are supposed to be 20 amps (at least in the 2017 code).

It might make a little more sense if he just meant those 2 circuits need to be upgraded to 20A.
 

steve66

Senior Member
Location
Illinois
Occupation
Engineer
Laundry, bath, garage, etc.
All those have to be 20A? I don't usually design residential, and I usually spec almost all circuits as 20A anyway, but I'm surprised they all need to be 20A. Even if there is more than 1 circuit, like in a garage?
 

480sparky

Senior Member
Location
Iowegia
All those have to be 20A? I don't usually design residential, and I usually spec almost all circuits as 20A anyway, but I'm surprised they all need to be 20A. Even if there is more than 1 circuit, like in a garage?
Yep. Pretty much every required dwelling circuit is 20a.
 

Eddie702

Licensed Electrician
Location
Western Massachusetts
Occupation
Electrician
I have had several people tell me that on commercial & industrial that 1/2" pipe and #14 wire could not be used. #12s and 3/4" is the minimum they told me.....and they believed it!!!

I asked them if it was in the code book.....they thought...it must be.


Engineers can spec anything they wan't. Doesn't mean it's code required. Code is the minimum
 

480sparky

Senior Member
Location
Iowegia
I have had several people tell me that on commercial & industrial that 1/2" pipe and #14 wire could not be used. #12s and 3/4" is the minimum they told me.....and they believed it!!!

I asked them if it was in the code book.....they thought...it must be.


Engineers can spec anything they wan't. Doesn't mean it's code required. Code is the minimum
This is usually where the Urban Legend Electrical Code comes from.
 
2 weeks ago I posted using 20 amp for general lighting. I could not find anything in the 2017 or 2020 code prohibiting using. The post comments/ remarks confirmed that nothing in code deterred using 20 amps for general lighting. I’m in Westchester, NY and heard this comment on not being able to use 20 amps from someone in the industry with over 20 years experience. I asked where in the code and did not get a response from that person.
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Professional Engineer, Fire & Life Safety
2 weeks ago I posted using 20 amp for general lighting. I could not find anything in the 2017 or 2020 code prohibiting using. The post comments/ remarks confirmed that nothing in code deterred using 20 amps for general lighting. I’m in Westchester, NY and heard this comment on not being able to use 20 amps from someone in the industry with over 20 years experience. I asked where in the code and did not get a response from that person.
I have never heard of not being able to use 20 amps for a general lighting circuit, commercial or residential. As long as the load is compatible with the wiring and the OCPD, why not?
 
My only guess on why that person made a comment to his team regarding not using 20amp for general lighting was probably related to cost. Cost is understandable, not to mention that 15 is easier to work with, but it should be stated as a cost factor and not a code thing. Now workers think this is code when it is not.
 
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