#2 heating oil fuel storage area

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CHARLIE W

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i am in the process of desighning the pumping and fill area of a fuel storage facility. i was trying to find out the class and division in the area of the fuel pumping area. could you tell me the class for #2 fuel / home heating oil.
 

wbalsam1

Senior Member
Location
Upper Jay, NY
CHARLIE W said:
i am in the process of desighning the pumping and fill area of a fuel storage facility. i was trying to find out the class and division in the area of the fuel pumping area. could you tell me the class for #2 fuel / home heating oil.
It sounds to me like you have an environment where there is outdoor equipment where flammable vapor/air mixtures could exist under normal fuel transfer operations. IMO, this would be found in the Class 1 electrical equipment locations under Group D Division 2 for an area between 3' and 8' of any edge of such equipment extending in all directions. Also, area up to 3' above floor or grade level within 3' to 10' horizontally from any edge of such equipment. Division 1 would be area within 3' of any edge of such equipment extending in all directions. Diesel fuel is a flammable/combustible liquid having a very low flash point. Its vapors are heavier than air and they will collect in low-lying areas, (sewers, basements, tanks, etc.,) and a vapor explosion hazard exists. Vapors may travel to a source of ignition and flash back. Easily ignited by heat, sparks or flames. I am not an expert on this, just my humble opinion.:)
 

don_resqcapt19

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Illinois
Occupation
retired electrician
wbalsam1,
Diesel fuel is a flammable/combustible liquid having a very low flash point.
It has a relatively high flash point of 100 to 125?F. If it is not handled or stored at or above its flash point there are no flammable vapors and no requirement for classification.
Don
 

wbalsam1

Senior Member
Location
Upper Jay, NY
don_resqcapt19 said:
wbalsam1,

It has a relatively high flash point of 100 to 125?F.
I thought it had a flash point of 72c....:-? In my 2005 code handbook the commentary table 5.1 lists kerosene and fuel oil at 72c.
 
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bobgorno

Senior Member
Location
Colorado
Diesel is not usually classified. Get an MSDS, establish actual flash point. It is likely higher than whatever your ambient conditions are. If it is not heated above the flashpoint there should be no reason to classify.

If it is handled at 100?F, on a hot day, with heating from the pump you might be at or above a 100?F flash point and need to consider classification. If its flashpoint is 72?C, you will need a lot of heating to exceed its flashpoint so classification is not likely.
 

wbalsam1

Senior Member
Location
Upper Jay, NY
don_resqcapt19 said:
That would be 161.6F....unless you are heating it, there would be no flammable vapors.
Don
Just so I know what's right...there is no classification and division assigned to the fueling and pumping area? None whatsoever? Thanks for your patience.:)
 

petersonra

Senior Member
Location
Northern illinois
Occupation
engineer
wbalsam1 said:
Just so I know what's right...there is no classification and division assigned to the fueling and pumping area? None whatsoever? Thanks for your patience.:)
I think the answer is that the mere presence of diesel fuel in an area is not grounds for classification. We can tell you that with some certainty.

Other factors might exist that no one here is aware of that may require some mitigation of hazard, but since no one here has seen the area, or what is around it, no one here is in a position to tell you with absolute certainty.
 
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