2008 proposal 210.8(B)(2)

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ryan_618

Senior Member
Please comment as you see fit. Thanks :)


210.8(B)(2) Commercial and institutional kitchens?for the purposes of this section, a kitchen is an area with a sink and permanent facilities for food preparation and cooking.

Change to read:

210.8(B)(2) Commercial and institutional kitchens?for the purposes of this requirement, a kitchen is defined as an area with a sink and permanent facilities for food preparation and cooking.


Substantiation: According to the style manual, the use of the word ?section?, as written, makes this definition applicable to all of section 210.8, not just 210.8(B)(2). Furthermore, the existing code language written in a manner inconsistent with other provisions of the code. If the intent of this rule is to create a defined term, it should be written as such.
 

charlie b

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Staff member
Location
Seattle, WA
Occupation
Electrical Engineer
Re: 2008 proposal 210.8(B)(2)

I think it is a good change, as far as it goes. But just for the sake of information, Title 296, Chapter 46B of the Washington Administrative Code defines a ?kitchen? in other than dwelling units as, ?any work surface where food and/or beverage preparation occurs and other countertops or islands.? This leaves out the requirement that there be a sink, and it does not require there to be permanence to the ability to prepare food in the facility.

Please note also that a kitchen, under this definition, need not comprise an entire room. Put a microwave or a toaster oven on a workbench in a maintenance shop, and that section of the workbench becomes a ?kitchen.? Is that a good thing? I think so. If you are preparing food, you should have the added protection of a GFCI receptacle, for the reason that many food preparation items (particularly toaster ovens) are poorly built and fall apart easily.

I suggest adopting the WAC?s wording.
 

eprice

Senior Member
Location
Utah
Re: 2008 proposal 210.8(B)(2)

charlie b,

Am I understanding correctly, the WAC definition seems to limit the kitchen to work sufaces, countertops, and islands? Doesn't this place lower wall mounted receptacles in the same area, outside the kitchen?
 

charlie b

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Seattle, WA
Occupation
Electrical Engineer
Re: 2008 proposal 210.8(B)(2)

Seems that way, doesn?t it. Here is the entire WAC rule:
For the purposes of NEC 210.8(B), all 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles must have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel as required by NEC 210.8(A). Kitchens in other than dwelling units are considered to be any work surface where food and/or beverage preparation occurs and other countertops or islands.
Please note, however, that the NEC does not require receptacles along the floor of a dwelling unit kitchen to have GFCI. I infer that the WAC has removed the requirement to have GFCI for the fridge or freezer of a commercial kitchen.

Any other WA residents out there have a comment?
 

charlie

Senior Member
Location
Indianapolis
Re: 2008 proposal 210.8(B)(2)

That is interesting since the compelling reason for the GFCI protection in a commercial kitchen was a fatality that dealt with a refrigerator (If I remember correctly). :D
 

ryan_618

Senior Member
Re: 2008 proposal 210.8(B)(2)

Charlie: You do remember correctly. In the ROC Mike Johnston presented a nice case study of fatalities, one of which was from a refrigerator. Talking with Mike, he told me that he could have came up with many, many more fatalaties to show CMP 2, but he beleived (correctly) that his substantiation as submitted would work.
 
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