210.52(C)(1) Regarding Corner Sinks

sfav8r

Senior Member
I just reread 210.52(C)(1). Can someone explain the logic to me? Why would you ever want a receptacle behind the sink or cooktop? I think it is pretty much guaranteeing that the cord will drape across the stove or the sink. I just don't see why the code body thinks this should be REQUIRED. Isn't the NEC supposed to require things that enhance safety?
 

GoldDigger

Moderator
Staff member
I just reread 210.52(C)(1). Can someone explain the logic to me? Why would you ever want a receptacle behind the sink or cooktop? I think it is pretty much guaranteeing that the cord will drape across the stove or the sink. I just don't see why the code body thinks this should be REQUIRED. Isn't the NEC supposed to require things that enhance safety?
If and only if there is enough depth of counter behind the corner sink, someone might want to put a coffee pot, toaster, or other appliance back there. It looks like it might be an ideal use of space to put an appliance garage, for a mixer or whatever, in the corner and use the appliance by moving it to either side of the sink.
But I would not like to see a receptacle behind the sink used as a contribution to the required receptacles per wall length on either side of the sink or cooktop, and indeed the drawing specifically excludes that use even if depth behind the sink or cooktop is greater than the minimum allowed which exempts the space behind from the receptacle requirement.

So, what it comes down to is that if the space in the corner is large enough, the wall area will be counted for the spacing requirements, but in addition there still has to be a receptacle within the 24" section on either side which is not behind the sink.
 
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Smart $

Esteemed Member
Location
Ohio
...

So, what it comes down to is that if the space in the corner is large enough, the wall area will be counted for the spacing requirements, but in addition there still has to be a receptacle within the 24" section on either side which is not behind the sink.
Perhaps I'm reading that wrong, but if the area (depth) is large enough, the exception is not applicable... so there is no requirement for a receptacle to either side within 24". All will just have to be spaced not greater than 48", including through the area behind the sink or cooktop.
 

GoldDigger

Moderator
Staff member
The way I read it, the note on 24" to either side is independent from the separate note about not including shallow areas behind the sink.
If the caption for the drawing had contained the shallow space condition I would agree with you, but it does not. It just refers to the corner location.
Instead we have one instruction that the sink interrupts the wall space and a separate instruction about when a receptacle is required behind the sink.

Tapatalk!
 
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david luchini

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Connecticut
Occupation
Engineer
Perhaps I'm reading that wrong, but if the area (depth) is large enough, the exception is not applicable... so there is no requirement for a receptacle to either side within 24". All will just have to be spaced not greater than 48", including through the area behind the sink or cooktop.
The way I read it, the note on 24" to either side is independent from the separate note about not including shallow areas behind the sink.
If the caption for the drawing had contained the shallow space condition I would agree with you, but it does not. It just refers to the corner location.
Instead we have one instruction that the sink interrupts the wall space and a separate instruction about when a receptacle is required behind the sink.
I'm with Smart$ on this. I don't see a "separate" instruction about when a receptacle is required behind the sink. The instruction is in 210.52(C)(1)...Receptacle outlets shall be installed so that no point along the wall is more than 24" measured horizontally from a receptacle outlet in that space.
 

sfav8r

Senior Member
OK, I think I have it now. We have to have a receptacle in the triangle behind the sink (18" or more space) to enhance safety by requiring one to reach over a sink to operate an electrical device. I guess I'm never going to see the wisdom in this. I *might* be able to go along with allowing it, but requiring it? We have just such a sink in our own home, it's hard enough to reach the soap when it gets pushed back there. Having to reach across the sink to operate a device that operates on 120v just seems inappropriate to me.
 

Smart $

Esteemed Member
Location
Ohio
The way I read it, the note on 24" to either side is independent from the separate note about not including shallow areas behind the sink.
If the caption for the drawing had contained the shallow space condition I would agree with you, but it does not. It just refers to the corner location.
Instead we have one instruction that the sink interrupts the wall space and a separate instruction about when a receptacle is required behind the sink.
The instruction is the exception referring to the diagram. The annotation to place a receptacle within 24" to either side is to indicate the wall space starts/stops at the space behind the sink/cooktop when exempt yet continued compliance with (C)(1) general statement. When the depth is 12"/18" or greater, the wall space is rendered continuous, so location of the sink/cooktop has no bearing on receptacle placement.
 
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