250.122(F)

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Dale001289

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:thumbsup:

An EGC run separately from the line may, for example, decrease the current from a bolted fault from 25kA to 10kA, but is not likely to affect the trip time of OCPD.


You probably enjoy sky-diving and swimming with sharks... Just guessing here. Point is, why take the chance?
 

iwire

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You probably enjoy sky-diving and swimming with sharks... Just guessing here. Point is, why take the chance?

The real point is, why add a code restriction with no real world evidence there is a safety issue?

So far all you have done is presumed there is a safety issue based on an exsiting rule for a similar installation.
 

rbalex

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I considered closing this thread since you have ignored the rules (you read them but didn't pay attention to them) for this particular forum. However, since at least four other moderators have commented, I'll let it slide this time. In the future, if you ignore them again, I'll delete the thread as spam.
 

ActionDave

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I considered closing this thread since you have ignored the rules (you read them but didn't pay attention to them) for this particular forum. However, since at least four other moderators have commented, I'll let it slide this time. In the future, if you ignore them again, I'll delete the thread as spam.
Speaking for myself, I did not notice that the thread was in the Proposals forum. I bet some of the others made the same mistake.
 

don_resqcapt19

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:thumbsup:

An EGC run separately from the line may, for example, decrease the current from a bolted fault from 25kA to 10kA, but is not likely to affect the trip time of OCPD.
I just looked a trip curve for a 100 amp breaker. A 25,000 amp fault is clearly in the instantaneous trip part of the band, but the trip time for a 10,000 amp fault could be anywhere from instantaneous to 2 seconds.

Edit....those numbers are off by a factor of 10. The currents should be 1000 and 2500 amps, so there would be no difference with that breaker between a fault current of 10,000 and 25,000 amps.
 
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Dale001289

Senior Member
Location
Georgia
I just looked a trip curve for a 100 amp breaker. A 25,000 amp fault is clearly in the instantaneous trip part of the band, but the trip time for a 10,000 amp fault could be anywhere from instantaneous to 2 seconds.


don, nice research. I'll bet those 2 seconds will increase as the distance increases, i.e. EGC relative to circuit conductors.
 

don_resqcapt19

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don, nice research. I'll bet those 2 seconds will increase as the distance increases, i.e. EGC relative to circuit conductors.
My comment needs to be corrected....I was off by a factor of 10. The time frames in my post are really based on 1000 amps and 2500 amps.
 
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