ABB Contactor control voltage

Desert Spark

Member
Location
New Mexico
Hello all, I am installing a receptacle for a range that is paired with a range hood with a fire suppression system. The receptacle is fed through an ABB contactor, AF26-30-00-13. The control voltage for the coil from the hood is 120VAC. When testing out the unit today the contactor was not functioning properly.

When I looked closer at the labeling I also see: 100-250V50/60HZ-DC. When I look up the part number on the ABB website, from what I see this contactor can be equipped with any one of four different coils for a range of control voltages of either AC or DC.

Initially I just glanced across the 50/60HZ and assumed the 120VAC was correct. I'm concluding now though that this is a DC coil only though. Further research has led me to believe that the 50/60HZ-DC is to designate a range in the frequency of the ripple of the DC voltage.

Am I coming to the right conclusion on this? I don't have a lot of experience on this type of equipment and DC voltage.

Would appreciate more knowledge on the subject. Thanks!
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
100-250 V is a wide range for a coil, you sure that isn't contact voltage rating?

Not familiar with the one you have, but most have coil volts marked right on the coil itself and contactor is more generic and can have several different coils (different voltages) installed in it.
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Location
Henrico County, VA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
The installed coil should be visibly labeled with its voltage rating, and you do want 120v AC.

And, no, the 50-60Hz refers to AC frequency, not DC ripple.
 

SSDriver

Member
Location
California
Post a picture and we can clear this up quickly. A lot of contactors will have the coil voltage labeled right next to the A-1 and a-2 terminals
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I am still questioning the 100-250V rating. Too wide of a range for normal coil designs. Maybe a dual voltage coil that needs taps changed per connected volts and is not correct. Connect 120 to it when configured for 240 and it may not pull in, connect 240 when it is configured for 120 and it likely won't last longer than a minute or or maybe even 30 seconds.
 

hbiss

EC, Westchester, New York NEC: 2014
Location
Hawthorne, New York NEC: 2014
Occupation
EC
Well, apparently that is correct. It's a "universal" coil that has circuitry to utilize 100-250VAC or use straight DC in that range. They have other coils that will do the same thing with lower or higher voltages.

If you apply 120V to the coil terminals and it doesn't pull in the coil has to be defective.


-Hal
 

paulengr

Senior Member
It could be a problem with the contactor itself too. In the size you need the contactor these days is usually IEC. It is disposable and not easily repaired.

The coil is most likely electronic. A DC coil with a rectifier and a tiny voltage regulator. During closing it uses a high voltage, say 100 VDC. Then once the contactor closes it switches to very low voltage/power, say 20-30 VDC. Typical ABB. Their electronic coils are notorious for failures. It is impossible to use your meter to troubleshoot electronic coils...the ohm reading is meaningless.
 

petersonra

Senior Member
Location
Northern illinois
Occupation
engineer
New iec contactors of that size can be gotten for under $20. Don't screw around with it. And yes, there are electronic coils that are supposed to save energy that can operate on wide ac voltage ranges. Just buy a new one. Does not matter what brand. It is not worth trying to fix or even to debug. You will waste more in time then the thing costs to just replace.
 

Jraef

Moderator
Staff member
Location
San Francisco Bay Area, CA, USA
Occupation
Electrical Engineer
What those coils have is essentially a little Switch Mode Power Supply inside, so it can accept that wide voltage /frequency range, or a straight DC input, because all it does is convert the incoming to (probably) 24VDC to give to the actual coil. So yes, if it "didn't work right", just replace it, nothing in there worth fixing. You COULD just replace the coil, but that is IF the coil is the problem, ie there is no other mechanical interference making it "not work right". Personally, I would remove it (since you have to anyway), put it on the bench, wire up 120VAC to the coil and see if it acts the same. If it does act normally, it's some other problem in your ANSUL circuit.
 
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